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Jujube soup recipe: comfort food for the fall

September 25, 2017

Jujubes, hünnap in Turkish, are more common in Turkey than one might think, and they deserve more attention given their health benefits, pleasant taste, and versatile nature. This fruit, slightly bigger than an olive, is reddish brown when ripe, with a light green flesh that is soft in texture. It grows in the summertime and is in season during the September and October months. Jujubes are most commonly eaten as a dried fruit. Sometimes, they are made into jam. However, they can also be bought fresh and used as a main ingredient in other dishes, such as soups. Selçuk Gönen, the executive chef of The Grand Tarabya Hotel, shares his recipe for jujube soup, a comfort food you’ll enjoy making as the colder weather sets in.

Ingredients

2 kilograms jujubes

1 kilogram green apples

2.5 liters vegetable broth

½ liter vegetable cream

200 grams potatoes

100 grams onions

100 grams celery

5 grams garlic

12 grams salt

6 grams brown sugar

8 grams black pepper

20 grams croutons (optional)

½ leek (optional)

 

Preparation process

Chop the jujubes and green apples. Add olive oil and a sprinkling of sugar and salt, and place in a bowl. Set aside. Optional, for garnish: Slice leeks thinly and fry them in oil until they become crispy. Set aside with croutons.

 

Cooking process

Add the jujube and apple preparation to a vegetable mix of potatoes, onion, garlic, and celery. Bake at 170 degrees Celsius for 20-25 minutes. Before the vegetables change color, making sure the mixture is still soft, take it out of the oven. Place the mixture in a soup pot and cook for 10 minutes over low heat. After the ingredients further soften, add vegetable broth to the soup pot and continue to stir until a thick liquid consistency is reached. Add cream, salt, and pepper to taste, and bring the soup to a slow boil. Remove the ingredients from the heat and place in soup bowls. (Optional: Ladle the soup over a bed of fried leeks and croutons.) Serve warm.

Eastern Halkidiki: An enriching journey

Marzena Romanowska
September 18, 2017

 

 

The area of Eastern Halkidiki is an example of how cultural and historical influences have no borders. Ottoman history enthusiasts might know that the heart of the region, the area historically known as Mademochoria, or in Turkish as Sidrekapısı, was one of the most profit-generating areas during the Ottoman Empire. Rich in silver and gold resources, it was developed in the 9th century in the present-day town of Stagira. Several fortifications of Machala, the capital of Mademochoria, as well as a recently restored Ottoman hammam nearby, are preserved and surround Aristotle Park. The park is an open-air museum overlooking Mount Athos, which displays installations showing the great thinker’s contribution to some of the proudest achievements of humanity. The ancient philosopher is the patron of the area, with all present-day activities revolving around him and his legacy.

 

Footsteps of the great philosopher

 

Occupying two hills of the Liotopi Peninsula, Ancient Stagira was a little settlement founded in 655 BC by the Ionian colonists of Andros. Although very prosperous at first, the city was devastated by king Philip II of Macedon, and despite the later rebuild, the place has begun to decline; six centuries later Strabo described it as completely deserted.

 

The reason why the place hasn’t been forgotten today is the legacy of its most famous son, the omnipresent Aristotle, who was born there in 384 BC. Although he spent most of his life in Athens, first with his studies in Plato's Academy, then later with his teachings for Alexander the Great, he returned to Stagira for a short period of time before his death. Still, residents of the ancient town have attributed to him importance and a respectable status. Aristotle is known to have studied every subject possible during his time, and it was even suggested that he was the person to know everything there was to know, a savant.

 

The latest archeological discovery suggests that people of Stagira have transported the ashes of Aristotle from the island of Euboea, where he died, to Ancient Stagira to build an altar. Although it has been destroyed by the Byzantines, the entrance making the memorial accessible to the pilgrims has been preserved. Later on, in Aristotle’s honor, the Stageiritans organized feasts and races, commonly known as Aristoteleia.

 

In order to follow the footsteps of the ancient philosopher, eight different hiking trails have been mapped out around the Halkidiki region, with the longest one being approximately 30 km. Three different paths cut through Eastern Halkidiki besides the one already mentioned, there is a route leading from Arnea to Varvara, as well as a two-kilometer walking path from Olympiada to Ancient Stagira.

 

The culinary tradition in Eastern Halkidiki is as old as the history of the region. The Ancient Greeks’ diet was simple yet varied, based on the local ingredients nature was providing them with. Today, when traveling around the region, one can see the great comeback of appreciation for local seafood, mushrooms and berries, and meat and wine. The reason behind this is more than just a temporary gastronomic trend.

 

Chef Dimitrios Tsananas Thessaloniki’s popular Met Hotel, a native to Arnea, says that the economic crisis is one of the reasons why Greeks had to change the way they thought about food. “People ended up with nothing and many of them came back where they were from. The farms that used to be shut down are now starting to operate again, providing the locals with great produce which they previously sourced from Italy or Spain,” he states. Current development is beneficial for the local cuisine not only in terms of sustainability, but first and foremost as a value added to the available varieties of food.

 

Among many local products, Olympiada mussels are reason enough to travel to the area. Feeding off of the sea and sweet water at the same time, they grow to be larger and tastier than those coming from other areas. Louloudia Alexiadou, owner of Hotel Liotopi and one of the local gastro-experts, says it is best to eat them only slightly seasoned because then you can still smell the sea on them and enjoy their full flavor palate. While serving four different takes on the local delicacy, her brother Dimitris recalls that when his family first settled in the area, there was no infrastructure not only to grow anything, but also to live. The Sarris family (Sarı in Turkish) came to Olympiada from Turkey’s Yalova region due to the population exchange agreement between Greece and Turkey. His family used to speak fluent Turkish, and the locals still use various Turkish expressions on a daily basis. “You can hear guys at the port yelling ‘gel buraya,’” he laughs. The events of the past helped the family to open up to foreign travelers and get involved in the tourism industry. “Everyone is welcome here,” says Sarris. “Tourism is not only musaka and mussels, it is about making people comfortable.”

 

 

 

 

Where to eat

 

A part of a larger touristic complex consisting of a hotel, spacious garden and a lounge area, Prasino Horio is also a popular locals hangout, with a full bar as a bonus for the evening. www.prasinohorio.gr

 

With an extensive menu of mezze and meat, Bakatsianos offers a wide range of local delicacies, paired with tsipouro and locally-made wines by Claudia Papayianni. www.bakatsianos.gr

 

Alongside a great choice of local seafood, the waterfront restaurant Akroyiali serves countless variations of Olympiada-grown mussels, which are an essential when visiting the area. www.hotel-germany.gr

 

Where to stay

 

In Arnea:

Chorostasi Mansion is a traditional guesthouse located at the central town square, with rooms overlooking the Cathedral of Saint Stephanos and the property’s back garden. The building, dating back to 1896, is home to six rooms decorated in a simple yet warm and welcoming style. For more info visit www.chorostasi.com

 

In Olympiada:

Having been forced to re-settle from the present-day region of Yalova, Sarris family took residence in Olympiada where they run boutique Hotel Akroyiali, known among the locals as Hotel Germany. With 17 rooms and a waterfront restaurant, the place makes an ideal base for further exploration of the area. www.hotel-germany.gr;

 

Award-winning Hotel Liotopi, known for its homey atmosphere and cooking workshops conducted by the owner, is attracting visitors from all of Europe. Their kitchen is the focal point of the entire operation: homemade breakfast is served in the back garden, while delicious snacks are on display during the day. www.hotel-liotopi.gr;

 

 

Arriving and getting around

 

Olympiada is located a three-hour drive from the Turkish-Greek border gate in Ipsala, with Arnea being a further 45 minutes away. Alternatively, you can choose one of the daily flights from Istanbul Ataturk Airport to Thessaloniki and then proceed by car. Greek Travel Services can send a driver to pick you up at a designated time and accompany you throughout the stay. English speakers are not easy to find in the little villages, you might want to rely on the help of someone who communicates in both languages at ease. For more info visit  www.greektravelservices.gr

 

What to buy, what to try   

 

From 2000 bottles in 2006 to 150 thousand bottles today, Claudia Papayianni’s award winning Greek wine varieties, malagouzia, xinomavro and assyrtiko, are the local finesse that add unique value to any dining table. Blends with international varieties such as chardonnay and syrah are also available. www.cp-domaine.gr

 

Liquor enthusiasts will appreciate Mountovina, distilled honey extract slightly resembling tsipouro, granted a geographical indication of Halkidiki region. www.honeygeorgaka.com

 

The ignorants will claim that feta is just another type of beyaz peynir, but cheese enthusiasts will appreciate the distinction, and enjoy Karagiannis feta, as well as choriatiko, paneraki and other varieties of cheese available in markets across Greece. www.karagiannifeta.gr

 

Jams and marmalades from the abundance of berries that can be found in the forest on the slopes of Holomontas mountain are another must-try. Ask at the Lanara Cafe in Arnea if Angelos Gagani and his wife Fotini have any to offer. If you have some free time on your hands, the owner of Hotel Liotopi, Louloudia Alexiadou can even teach you how to make the  delicacies.

 

From mid-May until mid-June, Eastern Halkidiki hosts Kouzina gastronomy festival, highlighting various aspects of the local culinary tradition. The event gives the opportunity to local and visiting chefs to expand their creativity and interpret traditional recipes with a modern twist. en.mountathosarea.org

 

Past Meets Present

09 September
12:00pm - 7:00pm

16 Turkish and international artists will present artwork inspired by historians, scientists and archaeologists to explore the meaning of taking a historical journey through contemporary art practices. A curatorial tour, artist talk, and a performance installation by TORK Dance Art will also be presented within the scope of the program.

07 September

End Date: 

Friday, October 13, 2017 - 19:00

Event Category: 

Event Address: 

Bankalar Caddesi No.10, Karaköy

Event Places : 

Past Meets Present

09 September

16 Turkish and international artists will present artwork inspired by historians, scientists and archaeologists to explore the meaning of taking a historical journey through contemporary art practices. A curatorial tour, artist talk, and a performance installation by TORK Dance Art will also be presented within the scope of the program. This exhibition is open for viewing on Sundays from noon-6pm and Tuesdays to Saturdays from noon-7pm.

07 September

End Date: 

Friday, October 13, 2017 - 19:00

Event Category: 

Event Address: 

Bankalar Caddesi No.10, Karaköy

Event Places : 

A porcelain-inspired peek into Ai Weiwei's practice

Ai Weiwei's first solo exhibition in Turkey presents a wide selection of works from this internationally famous Chinese artist. 

Meeting the neighbors at the 15th Istanbul Biennial

Considered the biggest art event of the season, the 15th Istanbul Biennial under the title “a good neighbour” welcomes 55 artists from 32 countries to display their works in six locations around the city. The featured exhibitions will attempt to answer some of the most burning questions about fostering a sense of belonging in a neighborhood or community. In parallel with the Istanbul Biennial events and in addition to the six venues of the main event in the Karaköy area, there are other venues around the city, such as Haydarpaşa and Sirkeci railway stations and the French Cultural Center, that are hosting running exhibitions. All events of this public program can be attended free of charge every day of the week except Mondays. 

La La Land in Concert

09 September
9:00pm - 11:00pm

The winner of 6 Academy Awards® including Best Original Song, LA LA LAND can now be experienced for more than its movie form. On October 6th at 9pm and October 7th at 8pm, La La Land in Concert will take the Zorlu stage alongside a live symphony orchestra.

Zorlu PSM
06 October

End Date: 

Saturday, October 7, 2017 - 23:00

Event Category: 

A-WA

09 September
9:30pm - 11:30pm

The three sisters that form A-WA (pronounced Ay-Wa) take inspiration from jazz, hip hop, reggae, progressive rock, and Yemenite women’s chants to form their eccentric sounds. On September 23 and 24, they will showcase selections from their album “Habib Galbi” to captivate their audience with their new genre of inspired music.

Babylon
23 September

End Date: 

Sunday, September 24, 2017 - 17:15

Event Category: 

Michael Kiwanuka

09 September
8:30pm - 11:00pm

British musician Michael Kiwanuka, winner of the BBC Sound of 2012 poll, will be sweeping the stage at Zorlu PSM with his acoustic blues-folk sound and soulful voice. He will be performing songs from his successful albums “Home Again” and “Love & Hate.”

Zorlu PSM
27 September

End Date: 

Wednesday, September 27, 2017 - 23:00

Event Category: 

Turkcell Platinum Istanbul Night Flight

09 September

Bringing together some of the best musicians in classical music, Turkcell Platinum Istanbul Night Flight will host a series of concerts at Hagia Irene. Famous groups, such as the duo Igudesman & Joo, the Berlin Symphony Chamber Orchestra, and the quartet Salut Salon are some of the groups to be featured in these events.

Hagia Irene
15 September

End Date: 

Sunday, October 29, 2017 - 17:15

Event Category: 

Gezgin Salon in collaboration with Limits Off presents: Kiasmos Live

09 September

In collaboration with Limits Off, Gezgin Salon, a new project by Salon IKSV, will be bringing the duo Kiasmos to the stage at Beykoz Kundura. Known for their electro-pop sounds and energetic performances that involve stunning visuals and lighting, Kiasmos will leave an impression on even those who are not fond of electronic music with their dense but elegant sound.

Beykoz Kundura
10 September

End Date: 

Thursday, September 7, 2017 - 17:00

Event Category: 

Fotoistanbul

09 September

The fourth edition of Fotoistanbul will present a large variety of photographs in indoor and outdoor locations to reach Istanbul’s people in unexpected places. Venue locations range from Ortaköy and Beşiktaş squares to waterfront sites.

Various locations along the Bosphorus
22 September

End Date: 

Saturday, September 30, 2017 - 17:00

Event Category: 

Diana Thater: A Runaway World

09 September
10:00am - 7:00pm

This multilayered exhibition includes the artist’s recent works exploring the current plight of animals living in imminent danger of extinction. The works, which will be staged in a self-designed architectural environment with free-standing screen structures, will give the viewer a glimpse into the fragility of our world and our place in its condition. Though the exhibition will be on display until February 18, the venue where it is held, Borusan Contemporary, is only open on the weekends.

Borusan Contemporary
16 September

End Date: 

Saturday, February 18, 2017 - 17:00

Event Address: 

Baltalimanı Hisar Caddesi, Perili Köşk No.5, Rumeli Hisarı

Contemporary Istanbul

09 September

Bringing together contemporary art galleries from around the city and taking up more than 13,000 square meters of exhibition space, the 12th edition of Istanbul’s largest art fair will continue to shape the art scene of the region. New additions to the upcoming edition of Contemporary Istanbul will feature its first ever outdoor sculpture garden as well as the release of a project called “Collectors’ Stories.”

Istanbul Congress Center & Istanbul Convention and Exhibition Centre
14 September

End Date: 

Sunday, September 17, 2017 - 16:45

Event Address: 

Istanbul Congress Center & Istanbul Convention and Exhibition Centre, Harbiye

CANAN: Behind Mount Qaf

09 September

Featuring new and existing works produced since the late 1990s up until today, this exhibition will provide an overview of the artist’s wide array of practices and media. CANAN’s works often involve the use of her own body to portray the ways the personal meets the political and the ways in which suppressed individuals can adopt new forms of expression.

Arter
12 September

End Date: 

Sunday, December 24, 2017 - 16:45

Event Category: 

Event Address: 

Istiklal Caddesi No.211, Beyoğlu

Ai Weiwei

09 September

Ai Weiwei's first exhibition in Turkey presents a wide selection of this internationally famous Chinese artist’s works, including several new pieces. The focal point of this exhibition will be on the artist’s study of porcelain.

Sakip Sabanci Museum
12 September

End Date: 

Thursday, September 7, 2017 - 16:45

Event Category: 

Event Address: 

Sakıp Sabancı Caddesi No.42, Emirgan

Past meets Present

09 September

16 Turkish and international artists will present artwork inspired by historians, scientists and archaeologists to explore the meaning of taking a historical journey through contemporary art practices. A curatorial tour, artist talk, and a performance installation by TORK Dance Art will also be presented within the scope of the program.

Anna Laudel Contemporary
07 September

End Date: 

Friday, October 13, 2017 - 16:30

Event Category: 

Event Address: 

Bankalar Caddesi No.10, Karaköy

Homage to Masters of Sculpture

09 September

The 9th edition of the Elgiz Museum Terrace Exhibitions, entitled “Homage to Masters of Sculpture,” is open until October 28. Sculptures by 14 Turkish artists are presented on the museum terrace overlooking Istanbul's district of Maslak.

 
Elgiz Museum of Art
04 July

End Date: 

Saturday, October 28, 2017 - 15:45

Event Category: 

Event Address: 

Beybi Giz Plaza, Meydan Sokak, Maslak

Zeferan

Influenced by flavor palates of two distinct geographical regions, Azerbaijani cuisine offers nourishing dishes that bring the element of surprise to the table. This unique fusion of tastes and textures take the dining experience at Zeferan to a whole new level.

 

When trying a new cuisine for the first time, it is crucial to go beyond what’s served on the plate. You must look at the experience from a wider angle in order to understand and appreciate the cuisine. And Zeferan, Istanbul’s only Azerbaijani restaurant, offers exactly that. Composed in a way that it presents not only cultural authenticity and diversity on your plate but also a tasty travel experience to the beautiful country of Azerbaijan.

 

Many elements of the decor, such as traditional handicrafts and original paintings from Azerbaijani artists, have been brought from their place of origin to give diners the feeling  of being culturally immersed  in a genuine way. The menu explains which part of the country a particular dish comes from, providing an educational element that further amplifies the culinary experience.

 

According to Azerbaijani tradition, one should never welcome his guests with an empty table. That being said, a six-selection sherbet tray is brought to the table to prepare one's palate and complement the food. The menu begins with a “welcome setup” including cheese and charcuterie platters, stuffed eggplant wraps, cold spinach salad, grilled vegetable puree, a plate of seasonal greens, and last but not least, a selection of pickles. Meat lovers will appreciate the platter’s variety, with a selection of delicious chicken pâté, roast beef, pastrami, roulade, and beef tongue. If you already have your favorites, or if you are dining with a smaller party of two or three, each dish can be ordered separately.

 

At Zeferan, pay close attention to the plates. All dishes are served on unique antique plates, collected from various places in Azerbaijan. The small quirks you can see in each of them remind you of your grandmother’s collection of tableware that’s been gathered over the years.

 

To ensure you enjoy every course of the meal, it is crucial to pace yourself and to save room for each incoming delicacy. The selection of cold and hot starters are followed by soups, such as düşbere, meat-stuffed mini dumplings in fragrant broth served with crispy, unleavened flatbread, or dovğa, a soup made of yogurt and herbs. The variety of main courses is lavish with a focus on meats. Azerbaijan’s staple foods such as lula kebab (made of minced lamb meat), piti (slow-cooked lamb with chestnuts, dried plums and saffron), xengel (a type of pasta with a meat and yogurt topping), and şah pilav (crispy dough stuffed with beef, rice and dried fruit) are all part of the menu.

 

The traditional tea service following the main course might seem like an entire meal on its own. Beverages are followed by a selection of pastries, jams, nuts, and dried fruit. If you haven’t tried an exotic fruit known as feijoa, Zeferan offers you the opportunity to taste it in their special pie. Take your time with the tea and dessert service, as all of this delicious food is being served against a breathtaking view of the Marmara Sea and landmarks of the Historical Peninsula.

http://zeferan.com.tr/
  • Sultanahmet
7:00am - 11:55pm
Monday
Sunday

Address: 

Ajwa Hotel Sultanahmet, Piyerloti Caddesi No.30, Sultanahmet; T: (0212) 638 22 12

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Zeferan: Tantalizing taste buds

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Gaea

The newly opened Intema Yaşam concept store in Kanyon offers customers a culinary surprise with the location of its trendy Gaea Restaurant. When walking from the store’s sample kitchen display section toward the table setups, you will quickly realize that these sample tables are a part of the store’s on-site restaurant, which serves up another element of surprise from its tasty menu offerings.

 

Gaea Restaurant’s menu nicely compliments the choice of products in the store, in line with its focus on the latest culinary trends and high-quality goods. Pick any dish on the menu and you will receive proof of how local ingredients and outstanding presentation delights the diners. We suggest you start with a selection of appetizers to share, such as pulled wild duck, piyaz (beans salad), hummus, or cibes (a type of local wild green). When you are ready for the main course try a few plates from Gaea’s diverse selection of entrees, such as köfte, salmon, or octopus tandoori. Although the names on the menu may sound familiar, there is an element of amazement every time a new plate arrives on the table. Bloggers will appreciate how the dishes are beautifully composed, and definitely are Instagram-worthy.

 

The bar, with an array of signature cocktails that alone are worth the trip, was set up with the working Levent crowd in mind. The impressive selection of eye-catching drinks, such as Afet, Gerçek Acı or Biraz Tuzlu, can easily compete–and perhaps even beat–offerings in other spots in Kanyon, making hanging out in a store an attractive alternative to happy hour.

  • Levent
10:00am - 10:00pm
Monday
Sunday

Address: 

Gaea Restaurant at Intema Yaşam, Kanyon, Büyükdere Caddesi No.185, Levent; T: (0212) 353 53 11

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MSA's Restaurant

The name for MSA’s Restaurant is no coincidence. Instead of fashionable ambiguity describing the place's conceptual secrets, one comes across the “still in training” statement on several occasions. However, the place, a training field for culinary students who aspire to create and develop other people’s taste palates, is already much more than just a work in progress.

 

İstanbul’s Culinary Arts Academy (Mutfak Sanatlar Akademisi, or MSA) has been one of the most important culinary institutions of the city for over a decade, shaping local tastes and training the next generation of gastronomy professionals at a level comparable to international standards. MSA’s previous restaurant did not keep up with the school’s expansion, eventually giving up its space to demonstration facilities used for classes. Even after the closing of the first space, however, the idea of running a restaurant as crucial to gaining a full understanding of gastronomy remained a subject of inhouse conversations. The perfect opportunity to open the restaurant arrived when MSA took over available space at Sakıp Sabancı Museum in Emirgan. At the end of the summer, MSA established a new restaurant on the grounds of the previous tenants, Istanbul's legendary müzedechanga, incorporating elements of its existing decor.

 

Although the previous restaurant’s legend lives on at the property, MSA’s Restaurant does not seem to be affected by it. Rightly so, since its concept has nothing to do with filling its predecessor’s large shoes. “You are at a class,” says the paper placemat on the table, as if trying to prepare its guests for the worst that could possibly happen during the dining service. There is no need to worry, though, as the staff members are not beginner culinary students, and their work is overseen by experienced professionals.

 

Working at MSA’s Restaurant creates the opportunity for chefs-in-training to take a look at one aspect of the restaurant business that is normally taken care of by someone else: service at the front of the house. Guests are expected to go easy on shortcomings they might notice during the service; luckily, there are not so many since the overall enthusiasm for learning a new skill amongst the workers is easily noticeable.

 

MSA’s Restaurant is definitely worth a visit, whether you are making your way around the museum or intending to dine here without any art viewing plans on the agenda. The bar section is overseen by future mixologists and there are several signature drinks on offer. The menu takes into consideration its guests’ time preferences, offering a wide range of foods, from quick bites to a full course meal, which you can enjoy against a Bosphorus view. A wide variety of current food trends are covered as well, from vegetarian, vegan, and raw (beetroot ravioli, sea bass, or salmon ceviche), Turkish fusion (soft-shell kokoreç taco), classy takes on street food (the infamous late night islak hamburger in a steamed bun), comfort food (noodle with veggies or in udon), to traditional menu must-haves (salmon salad or grilled meatballs). In case of initial confusion of where to start from on the menu, you might just want to go for one item in each category. For large parties, shared dishes for two to six people are also available. Leaving room for dessert is a must; whether you are in the mood for chocolate or fruity flavors, MSA’s Restaurant offers surprising combinations with each course.

  • Emirgan
12:00pm - 11:00pm
Tuesday
Sunday

Address: 

Sakıp Sabancı Museum, Sakıp Sabancı Caddesi No.42, Emirgan; T: (0212) 323 30 30

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Mürver

This newly-opened restaurant proves that the open fire cooking concept works well not only on camping grounds but also on top of a five-star hotel in the center of Istanbul. In case you have any doubts about what a center-staged stove does on a Bosphorus-facing rooftop in Karaköy, our answer is simple: it makes pretty much everything on the menu.

 

Mürver is the newest brainchild of the acclaimed Istanbul chef Mehmet Gürs. His signature eatery, Mikla, has been awarded raving reviews by both the local and international community; knowing this, it is easy to have high expectations for Mürver. The setting alone resembles Mikla: a hotel rooftop, a Bosphorus view, and a bar and lounge alongside the dining area–and this is where the resemblance comes to an end. Mürver is a much-welcomed departure from Mikla’s fine dining setup, which is noticeable from the lack of white tablecloth on the tables and the open, stove-dominated area where the culinary magic happens. Mürver’s setup also allows curious diners to take a peek into the back of the house, which sends them a message of honesty and accessibility. The same message applies to the menu price range that situates it amongst places more suitable for a casual after-work unwind.

 

Overseeing Mürver’s kitchen operations is executive chef Yılmaz Öztürk. Upping the ante of the smoking game, Öztürk has introduced and mastered various fiery cooking techniques used at the restaurant, some of which include wood-oven, wood-grilled, slow-cooked, and smoked cooking techniques.

 

For starters, smoked tongue with pickled green apple, ash-roasted octopus with Aegean greens, or calamari cooked over an open fire are some of the most interesting menu options. For your main course, try the Thrace lamb and dry-aged beef, which come with a plethora of side dishes such as firik pilavı, yogurt, or spicy fruit compote (hoşaf). Keep in mind that these main course dishes are served in portions for two. Leaving enough room for dessert might be a challenge, but if you decide to accept it, you’re in for a truly delicious treat. We recommend Mürver’s burnt sütlaç. Inspired by traditional oven-baked pudding with the perfect combination of crispy, smoky, and milky, this plate is way more than what you’d expect.

 

Since Mikla is known to have one of the best restaurant wine lists in Istanbul, Mürver doesn’t disappoint with anything less. The full bar, featuring signature cocktails, and lounge area alone are well-worth the visit before you begin your culinary feast. It might be overwhelming to try all of the food and drinks in one go, but we guarantee you will be coming back for more at Mürver.

 

 

 
  • Karaköy
12:00am - 11:00pm

Address: 

Novotel Istanbul Bosphorus, Kemankeş Caddesi No.57-59, Karaköy; T: (0212) 372 07 50

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Mürver: Playing with fire

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Izmir: Beating heart of the Aegean

The Guide Istanbul team
July 28, 2017

Boasting a cuisine developed on unique ingredients and award-winning wine, Izmir is the starting point of a memorable journey sprawling from resort towns like Alaçatı to the ancient sites such as Ephesus. 

 

 

Known as Smyrna in ancient times, İzmir is a metropolitan city on the west coast of Anatolia. Its famous clock tower is located in the center of the city which was once a busy port exporting goods arriving from the Silk Road to the west. Former trade hub, the city is an ideal base for curious visitors, who want to explore the region, discover the remains of ancient world, and travel further to the booming resort towns of Alaçatı, Çeşme, and Urla.

 
Although İzmir is the third largest city in Turkey, the lifestyle of nearly three million residents runs on a slower pace compared to the rest of the country. Therefore, the visitors find it easy to relax and enjoy peaceful surroundings just like locals do.
 
In recent years, with culinary events like Urla International Artichoke Festival and Alaçatı Herb Festival, generosity of mother nature in the area captured attention of foodies in and out of the country. Covered by international media, the early variety of sakız enginarı has become an endless source of inspiration for local chefs. Rare wild greens —like şevket-i bostan, or cibes—are widely used in regional cuisine, and best enjoyed locally. Same thing applies to seafood: surrounded by the pristine Aegean waters, fish is flavorsome, fresh, and abundant.
 
 
Where to eat
 
A specialty of İzmir, boyoz—a pastry with thin layers of dough kneaded multiple times with a hint of tahini is the way to start the day. Often eaten with eggs for breakfast, this mouthwatering pastry was brought to the region by Sephardic Jews from Spain. Try it at Dostlar Fırını. Kıbrıs Şehitleri Caddesi No.120, Alsancak
 
Located on the main promenade, Kordon Yengeç Restaurant is a prime example of how wild greens turn into quality mezze, served alongside daily caught fish. Go before sunset and pick a table close to the street to enjoy the scenic landscape with a glass of rakı in hand. Reservations are recommended. Atatürk Caddesi No.314/A, Alsancak; T: (0232) 464 57 57
 
İzmir’s take on fastfood, kumru (action-packed meat and cheese sandwich), tastes best at Kumrucu ŞevkiConveniently located at the Gündoğdu Square, the venue is an ideal quick lunch stop. Ali Çetinkaya Bulvarı No.2/B, Alsancak; T: (0232) 421 90 65
 
Tucked away in downtown Alsancak, Pizza Locale is an ingredient-oriented local Italian pizzeria. With many branches around the city, you will want to visit the original one. Open daily from 11am-9:30pm; 1390 Sokak No.5B, Alsancak, İzmir; T: (0232) 463 45 60
 
Located inside the French Culture Center, La Cigale's idyllic garden is perfect for a romantic dinner on a summer night. The charcuterie plate goes hand in hand with a bottle of wine.
Fransız Kültür Merkezi, Cumhuriyet Bulvarı No.152, Alsancak; T: (0232) 421 47 80
 
 
Tour around
 
Popular gathering spot for young locals, Kordon (promenade) runs from Konak to Alsancak port. With cycling and walking tracks, as well as waterfront seating areas, this large inviting quarter is where you watch the sunset.
 
Kültürpark İzmir is an expansive leisure complex containing a vast green space filled with rich flora, where culture events and activities take place. Running tracks, an open-air theater, museums, an amusement park are all part of the infrastructure. The 86th İzmir International Fair, combining cultural, gastronomic and commercial activities, will be organized from August 18-27 at the Kültürpark İzmir and Fuar İzmir building. Mimar Sinan Mahallesi, Şair Eşref Bulvarı, Alsancak
 
Before shopping malls arrived to the city, Kemeraltı was the place to go to. The historic market built during Byzantine times was an important trade hub of the Silk Road. From spices to textiles and clothing, the present-day market caters to the needs of both locals and visitors with a variety of stores lined side by side. One of the entrances is conveniently located in the city center, walking distance from Konak metro station.
Kızlarağası Hanı is a renovated historical inn from Ottoman times, located inside Kemeraltı. The inn houses small shops selling accessories, decorative objects, souvenirs, and more. Turkish coffee served at the local cafe is cooked in the cup.
 
Originally built in 1907, the Historic Elevator that leads to a terrace and a restaurant, offers a panoramic view of the city and the Gulf of İzmir. Open daily 8:30am-11pm; Şehit Nihatbey Caddesi, Dario Moreno Sokak No.76/A, Konak, İzmir
Having lived on the street housing the historic elevator, a famous Jewish poet and singer, Dario Moreno was known for his love for the city. The street named after him is home to a display of Moreno's poem about İzmir. Also, the songs played on the elevator are by Moreno, too.
 
Cable car in Balçova offers a bird-eye view of the city and the gulf. Up high, there is a picnic area with a restaurant. The ride is 8 TL. Open Tuesday-Sunday from 10am-10pm. Teleferik Mahallesi, Sakarya Caddesi, Balçova

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July 28, 2017

Aila

The recently opened Aila at Fairmont Quasar Istanbul proves that there is plenty of room for surprise as far as hotel restaurants are concerned. The new Turkish cuisine-oriented venue is one to look up to with regards to decor, menu and the wine list, and is well on its way to become one of Istanbul’s new favorites.

 

The restaurant has a separate entrance that doesn’t require unnecessary wander around the lobby, and all the details hidden behind the blue doors offer one astonishment after another. The modern, spacious venue is divided into multiple dining rooms, the main one facing an open kitchen, creating a space that is commodious yet cosy and intimate. ‘Spice Library’ is another distinctive decoration detail that adds a touch of elegant authenticity, often sought after by international visitors.

 

Aila’s selection of mezze is a creative masterpiece by chef Umut Karakuş, previously of Duble Meze Bar in Beyoğlu. Menu design makes it easy to navigate among a plethora of options, with separate sections dedicated to vegan mezze, the classics, seafood-based and hot dishes. With Turkey’s finest ingredients used to execute the recipes, the chef draws the country’s culinary map, ensuring the diners have enough information to make a knowledgeable choice. We wouldn’t have chose better ourselves, knowing that the chickpea used to make hummus comes from Çorum, prawns from Iskenderun, and the lamb is from Thrace.

 

Ocakbaşı section of the restaurant offers some of the finest meat cuts cooked up to your liking, however if you’re not a keen meat-eater, the selection of veggie dishes will not disappoint: traditional soups and salads, vegetable casserole and pide, or ottoman-style piruhi are all there to save the day. Parallel to the culinary map of Turkey, one of the Turkish wines is presented (listed according to regions of origin) with local highlights such as emir, narince, yapıncak or acıkara. A full bar serves classic cocktails with its own elegant, yet nostalgic twistyou will definitely want to try the raki-based new Istanbul Sour, the hotel’s signature.  

 

In the summer, Aila has nostalgic Turkish film screenings in the garden. On those selected movie nights fix menu is available.

T: (0212) 403 85 00
  • Şişli

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6:00pm - 1:00am
Monday
Sunday

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Turkish nostalgia under the stars

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Recommended

Top 7 places in Istanbul for detail appreciators

The Guide Istanbul team
July 18, 2017

In collaboration with MINI Clubman

 

Istanbul is the ultimate destination for those who like to admire craftsmanship in close proximity. Whether it’s a centuries-old landmark, or an elegantly plated dish at a restaurant, the city’s finesse hidden in the details offers the perfect backdrop for experienced explorers. Here’s our top picks to dine and shop in, staying true to your interests and impeccable taste all the way.

 

It’s about where you eat

Bomontiada is a modern post-industrial complex that resembles similar projects in major European cities. The mood is also very western-like, with hip restaurants, bars, and common spaces designed for young crowds to mingle and enjoy. Onsite restaurants skillfully blend modern approaches to cooking with traditional techniques, and if you’re a fan of local artisanal production, you can also shop and take your favorites home with you.

The understated facade of Mr. Cas Hotel is home to an architectural gem, true to its original époque and nostalgic ambiance. The top floor lounge, easy to miss if you don’t know it exists, serves its customers all-day-long. If the weather permits, observe the intriguing historical details of Beyoğlu from the terrace. At night, you will fall in love with the exquisitely sculpted bar.

There is no better Italian restaurant in Istanbul than Antica Locanda, a place that brings to mind traditional trattorias, yet true to its nostalgic Istanbul flare. Attached to a historical Greek church in Arnavutköy, the place benefits from its unique and varied layout making the space cozy and welcoming. We’ve already said it, but it’s worth repeating: the food is exceptional.

 

Wearing it the right way

Reflecting a modern approach to male elegance, Civan offers custom-made fashion for those gentlemen who intend to make a statement through the way they carry themselves. Accessories that make the general person stand out in a crowd by complimenting high-quality garment pieces.

Master jeweler Manuk Durmazguler is known for digging up a delicate beauty hidden in rough materials. Manuk’s Workshop in Karaköy displays accessories for men and women, including his signature rough diamonds, crafted using centuries-old techniques that Durmazguler, as a young apprentice, learned from his mentors at Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar.

 

All the things around

World traveler and inspiration-seeker, Aslı Günşiray gathered precious objects of desire, creating a one of a kind collection that reflects her passion for well-thought-out interiors. True to the idea that the devil is in the details, Günşiray filled her showroom with furniture and accessories that add a finishing touch to every type of surrounding.

Creating objects that last, Hamm Design uses high-quality materials to design contemporary and sleek interiors. The designers’ collective is comprised of some of the most talented creativity in the city. Crafts minimalistic in detail yet bold in design furniture pieces. Paying homage to the traditional mastery, Hamm fulfills an important mission of preserving the local savoir fare. 

In collaboration with MINI Clubman

To discover new MINI Clubman visit this page.

 

How Zeynep Ahunbay unveils the mysteries of Hagia Sophia

Joshua Bruce Allen
July 12, 2017

The many older parts of Istanbul are home to a number of historic buildings from the Byzantine
and Ottoman eras that require regular maintenance to keep
their magnificence. Thankfully, architects such as Professor Zeynep Ahunbay have spent their lifetimes overseeing the conservation and restoration of these buildings. Having been instrumental in the restoration of structures such as Hagia Sophia, Zeyrek Mosque, and the Theodosian Walls, Ahunbay this year received the Vehbi Koç Award for her contributions to Turkey’s cultural life.

Zeynep Ahunbay by Merve Göral

As Ahunbay told The Guide Istanbul, the work of a restoration architect is about more than drawing up plans. “For example, the city walls shouldn’t be understood as a wall. There are particular periods when they were made—the fifth century, the Middle Ages, and the Ottoman era. You have to read and understand all
of that before taking action,” she explains. “When you give the 
work to a contractor and don’t supervise it, they can treat it as 
just constructing a wall. That isn’t restoration. So the architects have to be constantly involved.” In 
terms of its historical value and the time spent working there, Hagia Sophia was Ahunbay’s most important project. The size of the sixth-century building presents unique challenges for restoration. “The first precaution taken in the 1990s was the stabilization and cleaning of the mosaics on the large dome. It’s very hard to reach of course, so they used a special scaffold. The dome is 55 meters up, and the scaffold was around 53-meters tall,
so you could touch the dome when standing on top. That was a great milestone because of
the difficulty of touching that space,” she says. Later, Ahunbay supervised the restoration of the dome’s lead covering, which was allowing water to seep through.

Hagia Sophia, photo by Merve Göral

Ongoing restoration efforts
 are removing cement that was added to the walls in the 1950s. “Some interesting marks have emerged from under the cement on the northern interior. Those marks have been mapped out for restoration that will begin soon,” she notes. According to Ahunbay, the building still has secrets to 
be uncovered such as mosaics hidden behind the remaining cement and potential artifacts buried in the area that was originally the church’s atrium. She also speculates that there could be tunnels connecting the Hagia Sophia’s underground cistern to the nearby Yerebatan Cistern.

Due to the vast number of historic buildings in Istanbul, Ahunbay stresses that the most imperiled must be saved before the worst happens. “For example, some towers and parts of the city walls are under threat and need urgent attention. This is a world heritage site that the whole world values and respects. Apart from that, there is civil architecture such as wooden houses that are in a ruined condition—if nothing is done, they’ll be lost completely.” Aside from the major projects, Ahunbay expresses pride about her restoration of Siyavuşpaşa Medresesi in Eminönü, which had been in a state of ruin for 100 years. This sixteenth-century religious college is now home to the Hilye-i Şerif and Prayer Beads Museum.

Hilye-i Şerif and Prayer Beads Museum

Encouraging tourists to go further than the classic sights
of Sultanahmet, Ahunbay has her own recommendations
for exploring Istanbul. “The shore of the Golden Horn is incredibly interesting, especially Fener, Balat, and Ayvansaray. Then there’s Eyüp, which not many tourists go to I suppose,
the villages along the Bosphorus, and Üsküdar. Every area has its own hidden history. If you know how to look at those places, you can read very beautiful things in them.” This eclectic taste extends to restaurants as well, with her top two being Konyalı, a traditional Turkish restaurant on the grounds of Topkapı Palace, and the Uyghur restaurants in Aksaray.

Get to know director Ferzan Özpetek’s Istanbul

Caner Kocamaz
July 12, 2017

His latest movie, İstanbul Kırmızısı, brought Ferzan Özpetek back to his hometown of Istanbul, and with all that has changed over the years, he had something to say about it.
 

Photos by Yiğit Eken

Ferzan Özpetek, Istanbul

“Istanbul is changing.” This is a phrase residents of the city have gotten used to hearing, along with “Istanbul survives only in memories.” The latter is also a line from Ferzan Özpetek’s latest movie, İstanbul Kırmızısı.
 It is easy to put the blame on the city even though it is the people who change the city, not the city itself. “What affects me is not 
the change in the city, it is the change in people, their behavior and worldview,” Özpetek told The Guide Istanbul.

Istanbul-born screenwriter and director has been living in Italy since 1976, but he keeps coming back to Istanbul for movie shoots or holiday, and because of this, he probably notices the differences that Istanbul residents cannot realize and has included them in this movie.

In Rosso Istanbulİstanbul Kırmızı in Turkish (Red Istanbul)—Özpetek invites audiences to see how Istanbul can play a huge part in residents’ lives. From the opening scene to the end credits, the movie takes you on a ride with the city, how it revives memories and becomes an actual character in people's stories. The movie is inspired by Özpetek’s book of the same name, which was originally published in 2013. Talking about the film, Özpetek says “it’s a story of an editor who goes to Istanbul after 20 years.” The editor, Orhan (Halit Ergenç), is in Istanbul
 to work on director and writer Deniz’s (Nejat İşler) book, which is about his family and friends. Deniz disappears the day Orhan arrives in the city, and while looking for him, Orhan faces his past and future in Istanbul.

The movie got mixed reviews from audiences—after the closing credits, people started murmuring, "Is this it? Will there be a sequel? What kind of an ending is this?" Yet this did not upset Özpetek. “I really liked people’s discussions at the end of the movie.” Just like the city, İstanbul Kırmızısı is mysterious, unpredictable, and awe-inspiring.

Through Özpetek’s looking glass


The world, especially Istanbul, might seem very different when you see it from Özpetek’s point of view. The success of his movies comes from showing things in a different light than they are generally perceived. Leaving the theater, if they get past criticizing the movie, the audience can see how important the changes they overlook can be, or look at a traditional concept from a different perspective.

A still from İstanbul Kırmızısı, Rosso Istanbul

The opening scene of İstanbul Kırmızısı is a construction site on the Karaköy shoreline. The rhythmic sound of a pile-driving machine repeats during the movie’s momentous sequences. “That’s a machine that takes Istanbul’s insides out. With that sound, many things deteriorate, many things change,” Özpetek explains. He fed the sound into the theme song together with the composers of the movie’s original soundtrack, Giuliano Taviani and Carmelo Travia.

“In the mornings I could hear it from my house, and sometimes it blends with the call to prayer and something so profane and so sacred emerges,” Özpetek explains. The way this sound is used in the movie emphasizes the degrading change in the city and is a denunciation of that degeneration.

Left to right: Halit Ergenç, Mehmet Günsür, Nejat İşler, Ferzan Özpetek

His directing debut, Hamam (1997), successfully showed audiences outside of Turkey a different side of hammam culture and break stereotypes. “They saw [hammams] as a touristy institution, whereas I shot the movie with a different feeling,” he explains. “Hammams and circumcision, these were matters of shame for everyone during those times.” The critically acclaimed movie went to Cannes Film Festival and other international festivals, sweeping awards in Turkey, Italy, and
 other countries. “Some people likened it with sexuality, some said otherwise. However, there 
is a philosophy of reaching
 the soul by cleaning the flesh in hammams.” Interest in hammams grew quite a bit after the release of the movie. “The owner of Çemberlitaş Hamamı told me, ‘I made loads of money thanks to you,’” Özpetek says.

“Now is the time to visit Istanbul”


Although he lives in Italy and is busy making new movies, Özpetek comes to Istanbul often for 15 days or a month. “Istanbul is a city that offers you thousands of things—it is a city that takes you away. I like to walk the side streets and sit down at small cafes, small places that you’d never think of.” He encourages his non-Turkish friends to visit Istanbul outside the movies as well. “I tell them now is the time to visit Istanbul. Go, stay at Pera Palace Hotel, a hotel that you would dream of. Now it’s very cheap. There is a great restaurant just across the street, Duble Meze. In the past, you would reserve your table two months beforehand. Now it’s empty. There are no lines at the museums,” Özpetek says, reciting his tips.

A still from İstanbul Kırmızısı

These days, Özpetek is in Naples shooting a new thriller, Napoli Velata, starring Giovanna Mezzogiorno, and directing the opera La Traviata for the third time. “I’d be in Istanbul right now if I wasn’t busy preparing another movie.”

Ferzan Özpetek’s Istanbul

Favorite restaurants
Karaköy LokantasıAheste Pera,
 Akın Balık,
 9 Ece Aksoy

Favorite neighborhoods
Galata, Bebek, Üsküdar, Kuzguncuk 

Top 7 breezy gardens in Istanbul

July 11, 2017

Sometimes all you need is some shade and a breath of fresh air during the summer time in Istanbul. Whether it’s for a breakfast with family, or drinks with friends to cool off while enjoying the sunset, a comfortable outdoor seat amongst luscious greenery is nourishing and essential during the hot months. Give this list a read before making reservations next time you’re looking for something like this.

Backyard

Backyard

Backyard is a kind of safe zone located in Bebeköy. You could visit both in the mornings and in the evenings. It has been popular for city locals due to its peaceful aura brought on by the welcoming garden. Backyard is popular for delicious breakfast options, prepared with local ingredients and also known for delicious salad options. Otlukbeli Caddesi, Bebeköy Sokak No.4 Etiler; T: (0212) 287 15 00

Zanzibar

One of the classics of the Asian Side, Café Zanzibar boasts a spacious garden overlooking the azure Marmara Sea and a well-thought out menu catering to anyone’s palate from breakfast to dinner. Cemil Topuzlu Caddesi Köşk Sokak No.112, Caddebostan; T: (0216) 385 64 30

Ahali 279

Ahali 279

Ahali 279 is an ideal spot for large gatherings as well as escaping the city for the weekend. Cabana-like seating spaces create a romantic setting overlooking the lush foliage. Breakfast is available all day long and the menu is wholesome and diverse. Kilyos Caddesi No.279, Sarıyer; T: 0532 351 79 84

Limonlu Bahçe

With its spacious garden in all hues of greens, Limonlu Bahçe offers you an escape from the crowded streets of İstiklal. Cool off with one of the many drinks featured on the venue’s menu. Yeniçarşı Caddesi, No.98, Galatasaray; T: (0212) 252 10 94

White Mill

White Mill

Set among beautiful buildings in Cihangir, White Mill offers a peaceful spot in the middle of the city’s center. The café’s large and cozy garden attracts locals daily. Enjoy a glass of lemonade or go for a beer, either way you are sure to cool off. Susam Sokak No. 13, Cihangir; T: (0212) 292 28 95

Mabeyin

One of the best places to enjoy rakı and kebab on the Asian Side of Istanbul. The restaurant’s menu is a mix of Turkish, Arabic, and Ottoman cuisines. The roomy garden can host hundreds. Eski Kısıklı Caddesi No.129, Altunizade; T: (0216) 422 55 80

Suvla

Suvla

Suvla is bound to be the breeziest spot in the busy business district of Levent. Decorated with flora and chic tables, Suvla’s terrace provides its guests with an idyllic atmosphere perfect for pleasant conversations over delicious dishes and impeccable local wine. Kanyon Shopping Mall terrace floor, Büyükdere Caddesi No.185, Levent; T: (0212) 353 54 64

Where to go for open air cinema in Istanbul

July 07, 2017

With summer in full swing, its time to carry movie nights outside to seek the pleasures of the warm summer breeze. You can end your summer days cooling off at these five different outdoor cinema locations and watch the classics or recent masterpieces while taking advantage of the summer to the fullest.

Open-Air Film Festival
UNIQ
Throughout the summer
As lights dim with the setting sun, UNIQ opens its doors for all movie lovers. Collaborating with Başka Sinema, UNIQ Istanbul is screening many award-winning movies including The Beatles: Eight Days a Week, Snowden and Trainspotting 2. For the festival program visit uniqistanbul.com. Tickets at mobilet.com.

Outdoor Cinema By the Bosphorus
Sait Halim Paşa Yalısı
Throughout summer
Gaggenau is taking cinema out on the port of Sait Halim Paşa Yalısı for a luxurious movie experience. The setting, right on the Bosphorus under the starry summer sky, is an exquisite match to the romance of La La Land and the thrill of Passengers that are among other hyped up movies on the program. Treats continue all night, starting with a pre-movie open buffet as well as popcorn and ice cream throughout the movie. Tickets available at biletix.com.

Open-Air Cinema Wednesdays
Bomontiada Avlu
Every Sunday from May 31–August 16
Wednesday is the designated movie night at Bomontiada with selected movies from around the world in varying genres. TV+ and Başka Sinema come together to form a unique cinema experience, embedded within the sweet summer air. All screenings are free of charge. See the full schedule at bomontiada.com.

Zorlu Center Open-air cinema

Outdoor Movies at the Park
Zorlu Center Meydan Park
Every Tuesday and Thursday throughout the summer
With a selection of movies featuring Oscar winner La La Land, animated comedy The Boss Baby, biography of outstanding women pioneers who worked for Nasa Hidden Figures and touching Turkish movie İkinci Şans (Second Chance), Zorlu’s open-air cinema has something for everyone from all ages. Don’t miss these outdoor movie nights free of charge. All movies start at 9:15pm. Find out more at zorlucenter.com.

Pizza Locale

Hailing from İzmir, the newly opened Pizza Locale is a living proof that one more Italian eatery is never one too many. The casual joint offers classic Italian delicacies side by side with their Turkish interpretations, such as Tire sucuk pizza. Gourmets will appreciate the fact that the ingredients are sourced from the place’s Aegean hometown. The venue boasts an outdoor seating space, as well as long tables inside. As reservations are not accepted, and the eatery gets crowded during lunchtime, arriving before or after rush hours is recommended. If you like your Italian in the comfort of your own home, the place delivers, too. Göktürk branch will open in August, followed by another joint in Ataköy in October. 

(0212) 327 02 01
http://pizzalocale.net
  • Akaretler

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  • Outdoor Seating
  • Casual
  • Good for Groups
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Monday
Sunday

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Şair Nedim Caddesi No.21,

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Pizza Locale, Akaretler - photo by Merve Göral

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Büyük Ev Ablukada (Live)

07 July
8:00pm - 11:45pm

Büyük Ev Ablukada has left their mark in the local music industry with their conversational vocals, freeing lyrics and flowing compositions since its formation in 2008. They will be taking the stage at Peyote Cennet Bahçesi in Burgazada on July 8th.

The band has taken a new direction in their artistic path with Fırtınayt, a set of live performances exploring a unique take on electronic music mixed with their sultry vocals. The night will start with Peyote DJ Taha Kiremitçi’s set featuring afro-beat, psychedelic and disco music. Büyük Ev Ablukada will take the stage at 8:30pm. Tickets at biletix.com

08 July

End Date: 

Saturday, July 8, 2017 - 11:45

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Burgazadası Mahallesi, Gönüllü Caddesi, No:60, Burgazada

#istanbulwithkids: summer time

The Guide Istanbul editorial team
July 03, 2017

Akbank Sanat

Akbank Sanat has put together a summer schedule filled with art workshops for children between the ages of 6-14. 

The workshops range from drawing, music, sculpture to mosaic and offer an extensive artistic exploration specialized for nourishing children’s creativity. The workshops include “A Journey of Music and Painting with Beethoven” singing along lyrics written to Beethoven’s famous pieces and drawing scenery inspired from his music, “I'm Drawing A Selfie” exploring different emotional expressions on paper through self portraits, and many more activities blending different artistic forms. İstiklal Caddesi, No.8, Taksim; T: (0212) 245 12 28; www.akbanksanat.com

Istanbul Modern

Istanbul Modern is inviting children from ages 7-12 to participate in artistic workshops, in the guidance of experienced artists until the busy school year restarts. 

Morning workshops allow young artists to experiment in different fields combining art history, design, animation, architecture with hands on activities. In the afternoon, artists including Sinan Demirtaş work closely with children in workshops with a new artistic focus each day. Besides Mondays, each workshop also takes children to exhibits at the museum that are closely related to the subject at hand. Meclis-i Mebusan Caddesi, No.4, Tophane; T: (0212) 334 73 52; www.istanbulmodern.org

Sakıp Sabancı Museum

Sakıp Sabancı Museum has prepared weekly summer school programs filled with six different types of activities throughout the week, giving kids an immersive artistic experience at the museum. 

“Art at the Museum” activities feature tours of summer’s highlight exhibits, Feyhaman Duran’s “Between Two Worlds” and Selim Turhan's “Thesis – Antithesis– Synthesis”, with follow-up workshops. In the afternoon children participate in workshops on drawing, illustration and puppetry by Enis Malik Duran, printmaking by Merve Turan and illustration by Erhan Cihangiroğlu, as well as making their own technological creations in projects of “Science and Technology at the Museum”. Besides artistic endeavors, the program begins each morning with “Yoga at the Museum” conducted by Cihangir Yoga instructors and keeps kids physical with swing dance lessons. “Camp at the Museum” brings camp spirit to the museum with tents, team activities and camp rituals. For a special treat at lunch, kids taste The Culinary Arts Academy(MSA)’s preparations for “Picnic at the Museum”. Sakıp Sabancı Caddesi No. 42, Sarıyer; T: (0216) 550 97 62; www.sakipsabancimuzesi.org/en

UNIQ Istanbul

UNIQ Istanbul’s “Creativity Summer Camp” consists of day-long workshops centered on engaging kids to think outside the box in multiple fields of fine art, theater, cinema, math, science, philosophy and sports. The week long program has two periods, the first one starting on July 31st and the second between August 14-25. Within only a week the program teaches new skills in arts and sciences as well as surrounding kids with an entertaining social environment. Ayazağa Caddesi No.4, Maslak; T: (0212) 269 00 69 / 0533 273 40 82; uniqistanbul.com  

Kidzmondo

Kidzmondo, a “city for kids”, offers children to peek into the adult world, trying out different career professions. This summer Kidzmondo is organizing three different summer camps specializing in arts, technology and the outdoors. Each program encourages creativity and team spirit as well as teaching children specialized skills in professional fields. With each camp’s unique selection of activities, Kidzmondo gives children a taste of different professional pursuits they might want to explore in the future. Mecidiyeköy Yolu Caddesi No.12, Şişli; T: (0212) 348 10 00; www.kidzmondoistanbul.com  

Istanbul Toy Museum

Istanbul’s one and only Toy Museum, on the Asian side of the city, is an entertaining location for both parents and children. The museum enhances its guests experience with different workshops taking place throughout the summer. ”Wooden Toy Painting Workshop” is one of these activities, allowing your kids to project their creativity onto wooden figures including animals, and personalized toys with different colors they wish to use. Ömer Paşa Caddesi, Dr Zeki Zeren Sokak No.17; T: (0216) 359 45 50; www.istanbuloyuncakmuzesi.com  

Istanbul Aquarium

Worlds biggest thematic aquarium, Istanbul Aquarium takes guests from all ages on a trip into the marvels of the underwater world. Following the travel route, you can visit 17 different themes from the Black Sea to the Pacific as well as a rainforest. Continue your adventure trying to solve the path of the Mirror Maze. Starting at 15:00 don’t forget to watch the feeding time of the aquarium’s unique habitants. Şenlikköy Mahallesi, Yeşilköy Halkalı Caddesi, No.93, Florya; T: (0212) 574 21 35; www.istanbulakvaryum.com

Forestanbul

Forestanbul is a freeing location for youngsters and adults with its outdoor activities embedded in Kemer’s deep green forest. You can do zip lining over breathtaking views, complete a high rope parkour or the climbing wall to test your limits, and play competitive paintball. With its escape room and go cart, Forestanbul adds on to your adventurous day. It is also a unique location for an unforgettable birthday celebration. Kurt Kemeri Mesire Yeri, Davutpaşa Caddesi, Kemerburgaz, Eyüp; T: 0542 740 0 740; www.forestanbul.com

Happy Nest

Happy Nest is a social and educational family club offering a place for entertainment for children of all ages. They host activities including ceramic, dance, theater and cooking as well as birthday parties and activities for toddlers younger than 12 months. Their multilingual library provides your children a place to discover new stories and improve their reading habits together with their peers. Onaran Sokak No.4, Hareket Sitesi, Etiler; (0212) 257 87 87; www.happynest.com.tr

PIQUÉ Family Club

PIQUÉ offers social entertainment for the whole family. While activities including art, cooking, music, theater encourage kids’ creative expression, sports facilities with a climbing wall allow them the physical outlet they need. As your kids socialize in activities you can take advantage of PIQUE’s restaurant, bar and lounge areas. Without a pre-established schedule, PIQUE kids can explore and personalize their time with a wide range of activities. Lotus World, Ambarlıdere Caddesi No.6, Ortaköy; T: (0212) 273 29 58; www.piquefamilyclub.com

Big Burn

06 June
4:00pm - 11:55pm

Between July 21-24, Big Burn is joining electronic music lovers with primary DJs and producers of the field at Suma Beach.

This year’s only camping festival of Suma Beach offers endless down and high-tempo electronic music for 3 days with a line-up highlighting legendary Richie Hawtin, Luciano for first time in Istanbul, tech-house master Loco Dice, house essential Dixon, queen of techno Nicole Moudaber and Berlin’s influential names like Nu as well as an Acid Paulu Showcase. Information about the artists and the program is at bigburn.istanbul. Tickets selling fast on biletix.com

Suma Beach
21 July

End Date: 

Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 16:15

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Gümüşdere Mahallesi, Boğaziçi Kampüs Yolu No:1/A, 34450 Sarıyer/İstanbul

Event Places : 

Jazz in the Parks

06 June
4:00pm - 11:55pm

Istanbul Jazz Festival’s essential Jazz in Parks, invites all to enjoy nature together with music at Fenerbahçe Khalkedon on July 9th.

The day will start with a line-up introducing Young Jazz bands, selected through a preliminary concert, followed by a performance by Spanish band Mastretta. The experimental music of Mastretta has a Mediterranean taste with a twist of rock. A day full of music will conclude with an outdoor movie screening of Sugarman. Don’t forget to checkout the Design Bazaar of TAK that will also have a stand at the park. Information on the line-up and program is at caz.iksv.org. Tickets are available through biletix.com

Fenerbahçe Khalkedon
09 July

End Date: 

Sunday, July 9, 2017 - 23:45

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

caz.iksv.org

Event Address: 

Fenerbahçe Mah., Fener Kalamış Cad. No:90, 34726 Kadıköy/İstanbul

Fatoumata Diawara and Hindi Zahra (Live)

06 June
9:00pm - 11:00pm

The sensational vocals of Fatoumata Diawara and Hindi Zahra will fill the terrace of The Grand Tarabya Hotel on July 17th.

Fatoumata Diawara came together with Zahra, a talent in both jazz and world music, as a part of their Olympic Cafe Tour. Their breath-taking vocals will introduce blended sensations of rhythmical jazz and world music to their audience. You can get your tickets at biletix.com. More information is available on caz.iksv.org

The Grand Tarabya Panaroma Terrace
17 July

End Date: 

Monday, July 17, 2017 - 23:00

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Tarabya Mahallesi, Haydar Aliyev Cd. No:154, 34457 Tarabya, Sarıyer/İstanbul

Event Places : 

Kerem Görsev Quartet (Live)

06 June
9:30pm - 11:30pm

Kerem Görsev is celebrating his 50th anniversary of playing the piano by playing with his quartet including Ferit Odman, Kağan Yıldız and Engin Recepoğulları. The quartet will perform at Zorlu PSM Drama Stage on July 14th under the 24th Istanbul Jazz Festival. 

Kerem Görsev fell in love with the piano during his conservatory training. He started to release his own music in the 90s. Today, he is among the leading names within Turkish jazz communities, performing both nationally and worldwide. More information is available at caz.iksv.org. Tickets at biletix.com

Zorlu PSM Drama Stage
14 July

End Date: 

Friday, July 14, 2017 - 23:30

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Kuruçeşme Mahallesi, Koru Sokağı No:2, 34345 Beşiktaş/İstanbulzo

Event Places : 

%100 Music: Electronica Festival

06 June
6:00pm - 11:55pm

%100 Music: Electronica Festival, an event by radio station Future Generation, is from July 29-30 at Suma Beach. The massive line-up consists of Andhim, Architectural, Claptone, Eagles & Butterflies, Elderbrook and Stavroz.

Last year brought 3000 music lovers to Suma Beach, Electronica Festival is preparing to be 2017’s biggest electronic music celebration transforming the venue into a festival village with multiple stages, pop-up shops, workshops and selected flavors. Tune in to FG 93.7 or visit electronicafest.com for a taste of the festival. Tickets at biletix.com

Suma Beach
29 July

End Date: 

Sunday, July 30, 2017 - 21:00

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Gümüşdere Mahallesi, Boğaziçi Kampüs Yolu No:1/A, 34450 Sarıyer/İstanbul

Event Places : 

Istanbul Cocktail Festival

06 June
2:00pm - 8:00pm

Istanbul Cocktail Festival, exhibiting Istanbul’s favorite cocktails with tastings and workshops, brings together all cocktail lovers with famous drinks from the city’s stand out cocktail bars on October 21-22 at UNIQ Istanbul.

The festival will answer all questions on cocktails from A to Z. Guests will both experience how to use the perfect ingredients in precise portions to make their own cocktails and taste samples from trendy city cocktail bars throughout the day. Checkout the Facebook event for further information. Purchase your tickets at biletix.com

UNIQ Istanbul
21 October

End Date: 

Sunday, October 22, 2017 - 23:45

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Huzur Mah., Ayazağa Cad. No:4, 34396 Maslak/Sarıyer/İstanbul

Event Places : 

Moovment Festival

06 June
2:00pm - 11:55pm

Moovment Festival, organized by One Colony, is featuring pioneering names of electronic music KSHMR and Ummet Ozan with exhilarating light and visual performances. Offering an in-city festival escape, the event will take place at Küçük Çiftlik Park on August 29th. 

Previously brought worldly renowned festivals including Life in Color and I AM Hardwell, One Colony is now crafting an original concept for the first time with Moovment Festival. Checkout onecolony.com.tr for more information about the line-up. Tickets are on sale at biletix.com

Küçük Çiftlik Park
19 August

End Date: 

Saturday, August 19, 2017 - 23:45

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Kadırgalar Yokuşu No:4, 34367 İstanbul

Event Places : 

Babylon Soundgarden

06 June
12:00pm - 11:55pm

Babylon Soundgarden, a music festival immersed in the blue green nature of Kilyos, returns for a second round on September 9th. The festival’s line-up features Gordon City, The Drums, Sevdaliza, Kadebostany, Whilk & Misky, Wax Tailor, Hey! Douglas. 

For the first time, this year’s Soundgarden mixes excitement with an option to camp for a unique night accompanied by live DJ sets. Featuring a wide range of genres including electronic, disco, soul, funk, rock, grime and hip-hop, Soundgarden attracts a broad audience for a proper farewell to the summer. Visit soundgarden.babylon.com.tr and festival’s Facebook event for more information. Tickets are on sale at mobilet.com

Kilyos
09 September

End Date: 

Sunday, September 10, 2017 - 08:00

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.mobilet.com

Event Places : 

Night Out

06 June
7:00pm - 11:55pm

Night Out, a night full of musical ventures, hosts latest rising and popular names from Turkey’s alternative music scene. The performances will be on July 6th at Moda Kadıköy, the heart of the city on the Asian side.

The third Night Out of the annual festival will be held by VİTRin, a project of the 24th Istanbul Jazz Festival to showcase artists of Turkey’s contemporary music scene including Ceylan Ertem, Gevende, Son Feci Bisiklet and Jakuzi. More information about the event and Jazz Festival is available at caz.iksv.org. Tickets at biletix.com

Kadıköy, Moda
06 July

End Date: 

Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 23:45

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Kadıköy, Moda

6 types of baklava that will surprise you

June 23, 2017

First comes a crackling sound of crisp, thin phyllo, and then delicious syrup flows from between the layers. This is the beautiful allure of baklava. Most likely you have tried a classic version, filled with pistachios or walnuts. But there are more variations of this heavenly dessert, and each one offers a different journey to the sweet lands. We have rounded up our favorites below to help you embark on your next baklava journey.

Baklava, photo by Merve Göral

Kuru baklava

The name kuru (dry) may suggest a lack of moisture. However, it merely has less syrup than the original, and more pistachio. This gives kuru baklava a lighter yet more intense flavor. It also has a longer shelf life, perfect if you want to grab a box on your way home or send someone a gift.

Çikolatalı Baklava

Why not combine two out-of-this-world desserts and make something new and great? Çikolatalı baklava (baklava filled with chocolate) is the modern meeting of these two delicious universes, and should be on your to-try list.

Havuç dilimi baklava

For those who promise themselves just one piece of baklava, go for havuç dilimi baklava (baklava sliced in shape of carrots). The generally larger slices (filled with classic nuts) are incredibly satisfying. It’s also the most popular dessert at the end of a feast at Nusr-et Steakhouse. 

Şöbiyet

Şöbiyet looks like a folded handkerchief and what it hides inside is a delicious surprise, kaymak (clotted cream.) Next time you visit a baklava house, you can cheat on baklava for a little extra kaymak.

Yaprak şöbiyet

Imagine the thinnest layers of baklava phyllo in the shape of şöbiyet mentioned above. Now stuff it with pistachios and cream, until it's close to bursting. Just the thought of it can make your mouth water, right? Picture yourself eating it…

Sütlü Nuriye

What if we put milk instead of syrup inside baklava? It would be called sütlü Nuriye. One story says this dessert came out during hard times in 80s’ Turkey to cut back on sugar consumption. Since people liked the output, it stuck around.

Get the best baklava in Istanbul

Baklava, photo by Merve Göral

Karaköy Güllüoğlu

Originally hailing from Gaziantep, Karaköy Güllüoğlu is an institution for baklava. The well-known location in Karaköy serves nearly all kinds mentioned here and is usually packed. They even have gluten free baklava, as well as a sugar free renditions for people those watching their diet. Rıhtım Caddesi No. 3-4, Karaköy; T: (0212) 293 09 10

Köşkeroğlu

Located right behind Güllüoğlu in Karaköy, the goods at Köşkeroğlu are sometimes overlooked but are truly exceptional. Make sure to try the baklava in house, as it arrives perfectly on a warm plate. Mumhane Caddesi No. 2/2, Karaköy; T: (0212) 245 52 45

Gaziantepli Baklavacı Bilgeoğlu

If you are on discovery in Kadıköy, make sure to visit this small baklava house right in the middle of the busy market. Their kuru baklava is particularly famous. Muvakkithane Caddesi No.56, Kadıköy; T: (0216) 336 00 49

Joshua Redman, Christian McBride, Kandace Springs and TRT Big Band (Live)

06 June
9:00pm - 11:00pm

24th Istanbul Jazz Festival will bring together TRT Big Band with bass virtuoso Christian McBride, American jazz saxophonist Joshua Redman accompanied by the captivating vocals of Kandace Springs. The artists will share the main stage of Zorlu PSM on July 11.

TRT Big Band is one of Turkey’s most valued jazz orchestras, conducted by the mastermind, Lifetime Achievement Award winner Kamil Özer. Combining famous names within international jazz communities, the night is one of the festival’s most awaited dates. You can find tickets at biletix.com. More information is on caz.iksv.org.

Zorlu PSM Mainstage
11 July

End Date: 

Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - 23:30

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Kuruçeşme Mahallesi, Koru Sokağı No:2, 34345 Beşiktaş/İstanbul

Event Places : 

Beyond The Memory

06 June
9:30pm - 11:30pm

Beyond the Memory, will be a reminiscent night of the 24th Jazz Festival on July 8th. The event will pay tribute to legendary flamenco guitarist and composer Paco de Lucía with an all-star performance on the main stage of Zorlu PSM. 

The night will join musicians who have collaborated with Paco de Lucia including Jorge Pardo, Carles Benavent, Jose Maria Bandera, Nino Josele and Piraña with David de Jacoba's vocals. Stunning Turkish names Levent Yüksel, who adapted Paco de Lucia’s song Palenque in Tuana, Taksim Trio, and Cenk Erdoğan will accompany the performance. More information is available at caz.iksv.org. Tickets are on sale at biletix.com

Zorlu PSM Mainstage
08 July

End Date: 

Saturday, July 8, 2017 - 23:30

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Kuruçeşme Mahallesi, Koru Sokağı No:2, 34345 Beşiktaş/İstanbul

Event Places : 

Taksim Trio (Live)

06 June
7:30pm - 9:30pm

Taksim Trio, a rising name in world music made up of Hüsnü Şenlendirici, İsmail Tunçbilek and Aytaç Doğan. The trio will perform at Zorlu PSM’s Drama Stage on July 8th in Istanbul Jazz Festival’s ViTRin project.

The local band has gained recognition performing at venues around the world including WOMEX music fair and London Jazz Festival at Queen Elizabeth Hall. Their distinctive compositions are appreciated for their rich harmonies and the enchanting sounds from the clarinet, baghlama and qanun. More information is available at caz.iksv.org. Tickets are available at biletix.com.

 

Zorlu PSM Drama Stage
08 July

End Date: 

Saturday, July 8, 2017 - 21:30

Event Category: 

Event Website: 

www.biletix.com

Event Address: 

Kuruçeşme Mahallesi, Koru Sokağı No:2, 34345 Beşiktaş/İstanbul

Event Places : 

Eskişehir: young at heart

Marzena Romanowska
June 21, 2017

With its name literally translating as “old city”, one would expect the dignity and seriousness of a centuries-old settlement from Eskişehir. However, unlike its name, the city is vigorous and lively, densely populated by young students from the two major local universities, and planned with the young in mind. Ideal for cycling particularly on both banks of the Porsuk River, the city might bring to mind European towns, which obviously had served as inspiration for the city’s development after thousands of migrants from Crimea and the Balkans settled here in the nineteenth century. Those Western influences are first and foremost re ected in the local mindset, but also in the city’s cuisine, culture, and cultivated traditions.

Relying mostly on their student customers, restaurants and bars in Eskişehir are very reasonably priced. The two must-try local foods include çibörek—a deep- fried, crisp pastry with meat filling popularized by the local Crimean Tatars—and Balaban kebab, which might bring to mind another Turkish staple dish, the almighty İskender. Balaban kebab has yogurt and tomato sauce served directly on a slice of pide bread with grilled chunks of meat, unlike İskender, which is a variety of döner kebab.

Eskişehir, OdunpazarıEskişehir’s oldest neighborhood, Odunpazarı, is where many local artisans work and reside. The city’s most picturesque quarter, which has turned into a hub of handmade creativity, is a labyrinth of narrow cobblestone streets surrounded by the famous, colorful houses from two centuries ago.

Your head will spin after seeing the array of ateliers and workshops creating anything from carpets to glass, so make sure you do not lose focus—the places you will want to visit in the first place specialize in objects made of lületaşı, or sepiolite. This soft stone is extracted locally in Eskişehir, which produces the most in the world and makes excellent material for decorative objects, accessories such as rings and bracelets, and last but not least, high-quality meerschaum tobacco pipes. Artisans place the raw stone in water in order to soften it to facilitate further sculpting. Once the design is complete and dry, the stone objects lose most of their weight, becoming very light and ideal for everyday use. If you would like to learn more about it, visit the local sepiolite museum: Eskişehir Lületaşı Muzesi, İki Eylül Caddesi, Odunpazarı; T: (0222) 233 05 82.

Social life in Eskişehir revolves around the Porsuk River. This is where to go for a stroll, meet with friends, or enjoy a Saturday afternoon coffee. The river also makes the city easy to navigate, passing near all the major sightseeing locations. During warm months, you can hop on one of the gondolas that offer rides along the river to explore the city from a different perspective. In winter, when the city is usually covered with blankets of snow, thermal hammams along Hamamyolu Caddesi provide a warm alternative to outdoor activities. Whichever season you prefer, Eskişehir will make you feel welcome and provide enough entertainment to  ll a weekend away from home.

Where to stay

Divan Express Eskişehir is conveniently located halfway between the train station and the city center and is within walking distance from the local Özdilek shopping mall and Acıbadem hospital. Often preferred by business travelers, the hotel offers comfortable accommodations for short- and long-term stays. For more info visit www.divan. com.tr/divan-express-eskisehir

For those who like a bit of history in their travel, Porsuk Thermal Boutique Hotel, one of the city’s finest examples of architecture from the early Republican period, is the place to go. Its hammam is connected to one of the many local thermal springs, pouring minerally enhanced hot water directly into the facility. www.porsukotel.com

Eskişehir to-do list

-  Walk along the Porsuk River and enjoy a cup of your favorite beverage at one of the riverfront cafes.

- Bathe at one of the thermal hammams on Hamamyolu Caddesi.

- Try crispy çibörek at Kırım Tatar Çibörek Evi, Şeyh Şemsettin Sokak No.15/1, Odunpazarı, Eskişehir; T: (0222) 220 65 10.

- Do not leave without the perfect photo of the colorful, old buildings in the Odunpazarı neighborhood for your Instagram account.

- Decorative objects made from lületaşı make the best souvenirs. Since the stone is easy to sculpt, it makes the ideal material for practicing the craft at home, too.

How to get there

With the high-speed train service, getting to Eskişehir from Istanbul has never been easier. Trains depart from Pendik three times a day on the comfortable, two-and-a- half-hour journey. For more info visit yolcu.tcdd.gov.tr. Although there are no direct flights to Eskişehir, nearby airports in Ankara and Konya provide convenient connections to and from Istanbul.

Getting around

If you travel to Eskişehir by car, you will definitely want to leave it somewhere central and explore the city on foot. Espark is a large shopping center located in the heart of the city and is open until late. Most of the key locations in the city center are a mere five- to 20-minute walk away. If walking is out of the question, simply take the tram, which connects all the key locations.

The 400-year march of Istanbul's cymbals: Istanbul Mehmet

Joshua Bruce Allen
June 21, 2017

One of the Psalms, composed over 2,500 years ago, says, “Praise him upon the loud cymbals: praise him upon the high sounding cymbals.” This splashing, crashing percussion has been making noise since the Bronze Age, as seen in stone carvings from ancient Anatolia to Egypt and Greece. But the cymbals we know today all stem from the workshop of one man, an Ottoman Armenian named Avedis, in 1623. Having moved from Trabzon to Istanbul that year, Avedis perfected a new cymbal-making formula and won the official title of Zildjian, meaning “son of the cymbal maker”. Europeans first heard these cymbals in the Ottoman mehter military bands, and composers such as Mozart incorporated them into their compositions. This legacy of Ottoman craftsmanship continues today at the Istanbul Mehmet factory, run by an old apprentice of the Zildjian family, Mehmet Tamdeğer.

Speaking at the factory in the Istanbul district of Esenyurt, Tamdeğer recalls, “I started at the Zildjian factory in 1950, and worked there up until 1978. In that time I learned everything about the production, pressing and turning alongside Mikael Zildjian. After the factory closed, naturally, we thought about what we could do. Starting out making new cymbals was quite hard in Turkey. The Zildjian factory had a history of 300 years behind it, so it took a lot of courage to start again. But going step by step with my partner, Agop Tomurcuk, we started a workshop and grew from there. When Agop passed away, I left to start my own business, Istanbul Mehmet. I’ve been doing my own manufacturing for about 20 years.”

The 1920s saw most of the Zildjian family move to America, where they continue making cymbals to this day. But while that factory now relies more heavily on machines, Istanbul Mehmet preserves the traditional, labor-intensive techniques that Tamdeğer learned from his master, Mikael Zildjian.

“A lot of people come here looking to make cymbals, wondering whether they can do it themselves. Not everyone shows their process, but I do. I’m not scared. Because the cymbals are handmade, it’s like an artist’s painting. Even if you want to make the same cymbal, you can’t. And the sound is completely different from a machine-made cymbal,” Tamdeğer explains.

A visit to the factory is like stepping into the seventeenth century when this loud tale began: the furnace used to heat the cymbals is like a giant pizza oven and the workers beat the metal with small hammers by hand. “I don’t add anything else to what I learned in Istanbul,” Tamdeğer says. “In fact, we still use a wood-burning oven, not electric. It’s like the difference between using an electric barbecue and a charcoal barbecue—there are some tricks to this trade.”

Mehmet Tamdeğer and MikhaeL Zildjian at the Samatya FactoryThat integrity has paid off for Tamdeğer, with jazz icons such as Art Blakey and Jack DeJohnette taking his handmade cymbals to the US. Despite its boutique methods, the company has become a global enterprise. “We export to around 100 countries. People have come to visit us from around 160 countries. Everyone’s very curious about how the cymbals are made by hand. Our factory has become a kind of place of pilgrimage,” he says.

Asked whether he ever tires of the cacophony, Tamdeğer replies, “I’ve been in this business for 67 years, from the age of 10 to 77. This cymbal production keeps me alive. That’s how much I love my work. It doesn’t stop even when I sleep—I’m thinking about the next day, what kind of new cymbals we’re going to make. If I were born again, I’d do the same thing.” With three sons who are drummers and trained in the family business, it seems that Tamdeğer’s legacy and the sound of Istanbul Mehmet will continue for many years to come.

Find out more about Istanbul Mehmet’s products at www.istanbulmehmet.com

Abstraction a la Turca: Fahrelnissa Zeid at Tate Modern

June 21, 2017

Fahrelnissa Zeid at Tate ModernDespite her acclaimed exhibitions across Europe and the US in the 1950s and 1960s, Turkish artist Fahrelnissa Zeid’s name has been heard more at auction houses than at galleries in recent years—she became the Middle East’s highest- selling artist with a $2,741,000-sale at Christie’s Dubai in 2013. We can thank Tate Modern for returning her to the spotlight with the artist’s first UK retrospective.

Born into a notable Ottoman family, Zeid’s relatives included soldiers, diplomats, and a grand vizier. She went on to study painting in Paris after graduating as one of the first female students at Istanbul’s Academy of Fine Arts.

The Tate Modern exhibition begins with Zeid’s movement from expressionism toward abstraction in the 1940s and 1950s, when she moved from Istanbul to London with her second husband, Prince Zeid Bin al-Hussein of Iraq. Zeid produced her most recognizable abstract works in the 1960s, which also bear similarities to op-art. Her husband’s death in 1970 sparked a return to figurative painting, mostly portraits of aristocratic friends in Jordan, where she died in 1991. Throughout the stages of her career and the genres in which she worked, Zeid’s pieces express a modern fusion of European, Byzantine, and Middle Eastern influences. Her abstract patterns recall both Byzantine mosaics and Islamic, geometric patterns, energized by a twentieth-century rejection of symmetry. Some of her giant canvasses— five-meters wide or more—produce a fractal-like effect by placing various-sized patterns in different areas. This shift in scale also gives an impression of dizzying depth. Other works from her abstract period embody a misted, textured light, as though watching the Bosphorus through steamed glass.

As one of Turkey’s most respected artists, Zeid’s work is on display in several private collections in Istanbul, including Istanbul Modern, Elgiz Museum, and Bozlu Art Project. The Galerist exibition Dark Deep Darkness also includes work by Zeid.

The Tate Modern exhibition runs from June 13–October 8. 

Why 5th Position’s swimwear designs are not for posers

Olivia Rose Walton
June 20, 2017

Buse Uğur and Ezgi Bozkurt, 5th Position designersBuse Uğur started 5th Position two years ago when, as a professional dancer, she got fed up with the lack of elegant women’s swimwear and used her leotards instead. When she met industrial product designer and model Ezgi Bozkurt, it seems she found her creative soulmate. The two can be credited with creating swimwear that’s ideal for the modern woman – a woman who doesn’t want to be embellished, but who wants to run, swim, play, and look enchanting all at the same time.​

“It was so simple,” Buse told The Guide Istanbul of her first collection. “Just six models.” Bozkurt was hooked: “I used that swimsuit the whole summer. It was the thing I was looking for but could not find.” Bozkurt’s background in industrial design and interior architecture lent itself well to Uğur’s vision, and gives the swimsuits their structured practicality and durable quality, with two layers of thick fabric. They had their first runway show in March 2015, just four months after starting work together.​

“Everything was with a lot of accessories, I couldn’t find anything simple. And everybody liked [our designs],” says Uğur. “People miss simple stuff.” It seems that many women in Turkey and beyond agree. The brand is now stocked locally and in stores in Sydney and New York. Perhaps the appeal lies in the absolute simplicity of both concept and execution.​

The design is reminiscent of Uğur’s love of dance, too: the name 5th Position comes from the most sophisticated ballet starting foot arrangement, the one all little girls who dance aspire to. One of this season’s bikini tops bears the name of Margot Fonteyn, the legendary ballet dancer. Characters like Fonteyn also embody the other of 5th Position’s principles: elegant sexiness in the form of a very feminine silhouette. “The main inspiration is still ballet and dancing,” says Bozkurt. “But inspiration also really comes from the women. We’re obsessed with designing things that you can wear while you are doing something, while you are active. We are not designing swimwear for sunbathing – it’s for people who live, not for any of those posers.”​

Find 5th Position at Souq Karaköy, Mae Zae, Shopi Go, and Vakkorama, or online at www.5thpositionstore.com

Losing heat: the culinary art behind raw food

Monica Liau
June 07, 2017

Aşure, Noah's Pudding - photo by Maja Topcagic

Dr. Sana S. Hećo is a walking poster child for her raw food profession. She glows with good health that seems to radiate from somewhere deep inside and her constant talk about nutrition is punctuated only by a slight, beatific smile that seems to say “it’s all good.” With the launch of her first self-published raw cookbook, Orient Expressed, in Istanbul, the Bosnian-Swedish medical doctor, naturopath, and raw food chef pays homage to and reimagines Levantine cuisine, from which she has drawn so much inspiration on her journey.

From pills to chia seeds

The road to raw food was a long one for Hećo, who originally worked and trained as a medical doctor in Sweden. During this time, she was experiencing chronic health issues that even surgery, hormonal therapy, and painkillers, could not cure. “I looked like a 100-year-old,” Hećo says. “I was desperate.” After listening to a podcast by an American naturopath that her sister sent, she felt new pieces fall into place “For me, the medical world is very two dimensional at best. It never felt right to me,” Hećo says. “Any type of bodily discomfort is a blessing in disguise because your body is trying to tell you something. It’s saying please treat me in a natural way. Your body never turns against you, it’s just trying to get your attention.”

Hećo’s first experience with raw food came soon after she moved to London to study naturopathic medicine. A friend brought her raw chocolate, and the taste was a moving experience. “I took a bite of that chocolate and I had an out-of-body experience. This is what food is supposed to be,” Hećo asserts. “This is the potential of food.” Back then, raw food was an alien concept and Hećo had to do a lot of research. She even took a few years off, moved to California, and began training at a culinary institute in Santa Monica where she learned some of the more subtle arts of creating elevated dishes. Today, she works as a consultant, teaches raw food workshops, and helps food and beverage operations, such as Atelier Raw in Istanbul, develop menus and recipes.

Hećo acknowledges that raw food still feels inaccessible to many people, especially home cooks, and is sometimes glossed over as a fad. Many diners feel like they pay too much for something that does not taste very good, and that the equipment associated with raw food—dehydrators, Vitamix blenders, and the like—is expensive and intimidating. However, Hećo says you can skip the crazy equipment and start simple with the food that is right for you. The recipes in her book reflect this philosophy, with dishes that range from simple to extraordinarily complex as well as a breakdown of different ingredients, their health benefits, and how to use them.

“Raw food is anything. It’s about what your body needs, simple as that,” she says. “Just become more excited about your food, about its history, and biology. You don’t want anything lower than life and appreciation in your body. My whole message, raw food or not, is to just bring more awareness to what you’re doing and eating. It’s a game changer.”

Inspiring Istanbul

MTurkey has always been a deep well of inspiration. Hećo first came to Istanbul to help Atelier Raw develop recipes for the launch of its raw food concept, and the city helped to fuel her cookbook. Even before she arrived, however, Hećo has always felt a connection to Turkey. “When I was training at culinary school in California, I found myself recreating oriental dishes,” she says. “Obviously, I’m not from the Orient, but I am from the Orient of Europe. Sarajevo is a mini Istanbul. There are so many things we share with this whole region—North Africa, West Asia, the Balkans, Iran—we’re all connected because the Ottoman Empire ruled. When I got home from California, I began to work in earnest to recreate this cuisine.”

Her new, beautifully photographed cookbook was launched in Istanbul this spring as a small tribute to the place this city has played in her life and heart. “I chose to have the book premier in Istanbul because Istanbul has been experiencing some harsh times. It’s rough, people are losing hope,” she says. “I come from Bosnia. I’ve been through war. I know when fear sets in, you forget the things that really matter. Turkey helped Bosnia a lot after the war, and I have always been grateful. So, I wanted to bring something that is such a love project to the region, bring it back to Istanbul, and pay my own small form of tribute.”

Orient Expressed is available at Minoa Bookstore, Souq Dükkan, and Atelier Raw—where you’ll also find snacks designed by Dr. Sana Hećo. For more information and for a digital copy of the cookbook, visit suhailpublishing.com. 

The voice of the Aegean: Vassiliki Papageorgiou

Joshua Bruce Allen
June 05, 2017

Vassiliki Papageorgiou, photo by Merve GöralThe 1923 population exchange between Turkey and Greece was a defining moment for both countries, with around 2 million people relocated to new lands over the border. Although many people traveled with what little they could carry, they did not leave their memories behind.

In Greece, their grandchildren have led a rediscovery of Greek- Anatolian music, and some have returned to Turkey to dig deeper into its cosmopolitan sounds. One of these grandchildren is Athens-born and Istanbul-based singer Vassiliki Papageorgiou.

Papageorgiou first visited Istanbul with the musicians from the Costas Ferris film Rembetiko (1983). This film did much to spark a resurgence of interest in the rembetiko style, which originated in late-nineteenth century İzmir and Athens.

“It was 1983 when I came the first time,” Papageorgiou told The Guide Istanbul. “I remember when we first entered to have our first rehearsal when we came from Athens, Sezen Aksu was having her rehearsal at the place. It was a big success, because at the time Istanbul wasn’t like now, when you can hear other languages. At that time, Turkey was still quite closed. It was the first time that a rembetiko group came from Greece, so it was full every night with Turkish people, Rum [Greek] people. We came for three weeks and stayed three months.”

After this positive reception, Papageorgiou decided to discover more of Turkey’s traditional music. Her meeting with Istanbul-based Greek musician Nikiforos Metaxas was a pivotal moment. “I met him when I came here and we started working together, forming new groups with Greeks and Turks. We played traditional music, but also composed our own music based on that, and I started writing lyrics. We also became a couple and moved to Heybeliada, where we lived until very recently when he passed away,” she explains. Metaxas’ research on the minority Rum, Armenian, and Jewish composers of the Ottoman Empire led to a new enthusiasm for this music across the Aegean. As the singer says, “Since then, a lot of people have become interested in this and traditional music. The kanun was fading in Greece at the time, but through Nikiforos and the group Bosphorus, we have so many people playing it now.”

For Papageorgiou, Istanbul had a special resonance, like meeting a long-lost relative who remembers you as a child. “Istanbul is an incredibly inspiring place. You can have a lot of experiences here because everything is changing. When I first came,

I used to walk a lot in old Istanbul along the city walls. Being Greek, you come home when you come to Istanbul. Of course, it’s Turkish and all that, but it contains so much of our history as well.”

The Greek population of Istanbul has steadily declined since the 1920s, but the bonds of memory are still intact. “I remember so many times saying to Turkish friends, ‘I’m a foreigner.’ And they say, ‘No, you’re from here.’ Of course, in older times it was easier because people had a lot of Rum friends and they were brought up together. Now I’m not sure that the young people even know there were Rum here. But I think we shouldn’t lose our common memory and history. These things bring our souls together. If we keep our memory alive then we realize how precious it is to be together, to share, to defend this.”

With a background in translating poets such as Rilke into Greek, Papageorgiou also translates the Turkish lyrics of her songs into Greek for her album sleeves. She and her husband Nikiforos Metaxas had worked to create a center for Byzantine, Greek,

and Ottoman music at the old Greek school on Heybeliada with the support of the Greek and Turkish governments, but the project fell through following the Greek  financial crisis. When asked whether the center could be revived, she says simply, “İnşallah.” Meanwhile, she continues to work with master musicians such as kemençe player Derya Türkan, clarinetist Oğuz Büyükberber, and ancient lyrist Aliki Markantonatou.

Stay up to date with new album releases and other news at www.vassilikipapageorgiou.net

The lights of Ramadan: Istanbul’s mahya tradition

Joshua Bruce Allen
May 31, 2017

Visiting Istanbul in 1854, French writer Theophile Gautier described an incredible sight from his hotel in Beyoğlu: “On the other side of the Golden Horn, Constantinople glows and sparkles, like the crown of carbuncles of an oriental emperor. The minarets blaze with rows of lamps from all their galleries; and from spire to spire run, in fiery letters, verses of the Kuran, written upon the azure as on the pages of a Divine book.” Gautier was describing the mahya lights, a Ramadan tradition that originated in Ottoman Istanbul.

The word mahya derives from the Persian māhī, meaning “monthly”, in reference to the holiest month of the Islamic calendar. There is no definite proof of when this practice began, but German traveler Salomon Schweigger described words and pictures formed with lights strung between a mosque’s minarets in the sixteenth century. Aside from giving a religious message, the mahya lamps also illuminated the streets for the people eating and socializing after iftar. Words from the Quran and Hadith, names of God, and phrases such as “Welcome Ramadan” were common, as well as figures such as flowers, fountains, and crescent moons. These images had to be planned to suit the height of the minarets and the distance between them—for example, only a large mosque such as Beyazıt Mosque could hold a phrase such as re’sü’l-hikmeti mehâfetullâh in one line.

Mahya

Nowadays it is quite easy to create moving mahya, because the mosques use LED lights. But the mahya masters of the Ottoman period had to be more skillful. One example was the “walking mahya”, where men would pull the ropes supporting the hanging lamps to make them go back and forth. In the 1870s, muezzin Abdüllâtif Efendi created a mahya carriage above Süleymaniye Mosque, with another line of boats and fish underneath. By pulling the ropes, he made the figures move like a fiery film. So keep your eyes on the skies this Ramadan, you never know what you might see.

Top 7 non-fiction books to take with you to Istanbul

Joshua Bruce Allen
May 31, 2017

The large number of books available on Istanbul makes it hard to separate the dry from the inspiring. These recommended books will show you why Istanbul deserves its place in the pantheon of great cities.

Top 7 non-fiction books to with you to Istanbul

Bettany Hughes
Istanbul: A Tale of Three Cities

The product of a decade’s research, British historian Hughes’ book spans 8,000 years of history in Istanbul, from the earliest ruins discovered in the Yenikapı excavations on to the Romans, Byzantines, Ottomans and present day. This account manages to be comprehensive, detailed, and readable at the same time.

Orhan Pamuk
Istanbul: Memories and the City

More than just a memoir, this book introduces us to Istanbul artists, writers, neighborhoods, and lifestyles through the prism of Pamuk’s early life. No guided tour could possibly be as personal or immersive
as this. It is also invaluable for understanding the melancholy atmosphere and romantic obsessions of Pamuk’s novels.

Philip Mansel
Constantinople: City of the World’s Desire
British historian Mansel’s book takes a thematic approach
to the city, talking as fluently about culture and religion as it does about battles and sultans. Mansel has a talent for picking out intriguing characters who flit between European and Asian roles, as well as for recounting real incidents that are stranger than fiction.

An Istanbul Anthology: Travel Writing Through the Centuries

Edited by Turkish writer and journalist Kaya Genç, the selections in this book illustrate the many perspectives and personalities that foreign visitors have brought to the
city. Accounts by Arthur Conan Doyle, Andre Gide, Gustave Flaubert, and Ernest Hemingway demonstrate the outside eye’s eternal fascination with Istanbul.

John Freely
Stamboul Sketches: Encounters in Old Istanbul

American travel writer and historian Freely is better known for his lengthy tomes, but this book takes a shorter and more eccentric approach. Subjects include Istanbul’s street cats, wandering dervishes and folk singers, the seasonal winds, city markets, cemeteries, and the lunar calendar.

M. Şükrü Hanioğlu
Atatürk: An Intellectual Biography
Although his face looks out from a million portraits in Istanbul, not everyone agrees on what Mustafa Kemal Atatürk actually symbolizes. In this book, Princeton University academic Hanioğlu traces the origins of Atatürk’s thought from the late- Ottoman era to the new Republic of Turkey, showing how political, social, and philosophical trends have shaped debates that are still current today.

Murat Gül and Trevor Howells
Istanbul Architecture
Once you look past the simple binaries of Greek-Turkish or ancient-modern, there is a multiplicity of architectural styles on display in Istanbul. Gül and Howells cover all the major structures of Istanbul area by area, from the historical peninsula to the Asian side and the northern shores of the Bosphorus. With this book in hand, you will see the marvelous fusion of influences that make up every street.
 

Güllaç: the rosy dessert of Ramadan tables

May 30, 2017

Güllaç, photo by The Ritz-CarltonRamadan in Turkey sees the arrival of a few annual traditions: drums beating out the wake up call for sahur, dates to break fasting, shadow plays and the simple dessert güllaç after a large iftar dinner. Güllaç is almost never found anywhere in Turkey throughout the rest of the year, but in Ramadan it is even more popular than baklava.

As with other Turkish desserts, yufka (phyllo pastry) is the main ingredient in güllaç. The thin layers are white because the main ingredient is cornstarch, unlike the golden color baklava has. Dry and paper-thin, this type of dough was first made in the Ottoman era as a way to preserve food for long periods. Before people would turn this type of food into a meal—what would they call (food) in general—they would soften the dough with milk and add sugar to it 

This dish later had rose water and various nuts added to it to improve the taste. Because of the added rose water, the name of the dessert changed to güllü aş (literally, food with rose.) In time, the name evolved into one word, güllaç—just like sütlaç.

There are pistachios and hazelnuts in between the center layers of güllaç. Pistachios are also sprinkled on the top of the dessert as a garnish. Other garnishes vary according to the season in which Ramadan falls. A cherry on top or pomegranate seeds are often also used as an embellishment. 

After a long day of fasting, the iftar dinner is usually a rich feast and stomachs fill up quickly—often going a little overboard. After such a meal, for dessert people seek something light that will not upset the stomach. In this case, güllaç is an ideal option. Unlike baklava or other syrupy Turkish desserts, güllaç is light due to being milk based. 

Take it home

Güllaç, photo by BHU

Güllaç is a very easy dessert to make at home. You can either prepare the phyllo with cornstarch and flour in a pan and dry it or you can buy it at a supermarket in Istanbul during Ramadan. These dry doughs can be stored up to two years in the proper conditions. 

For every 10 layers of phyllo dough, use one and a half liters of milk. Add two to six cups of sugar to taste. Add an optional half cup of rose water to the mix, which you will later pour over the layers of dough. Do not forget to put your favorite nuts in between the layers. Sprinkle some pistachios and seasonal fruit of your choice to dress the dessert.

Where to have güllaç during Ramadan 

Tuğra Restaurant

This restaurant at Çırağan Hotel serves renditions of Turkish and Ottoman cuisine. The Ottoman-style interiors complement the food and dining on the terrace, overlooking the Bosphorus is an unmatched joy in the summer. Çırağan Caddesi No.32, Beşiktaş; T: (0212) 326 46 46 

Karaköy Güllüoğlu

Known for offering the best baklava in town, Karaköy Güllüoğlu is your go-to place to try güllaç or take a box, or even a tray, with you. Do not forget to try a few piece or two, or five, of their myriad baklava while there. Rıhtım Caddesi, No.3-4, Karaköy; T: (0212) 293 09 10

Son Feci Bisiklet

05 May
8:30pm - 11:00pm

Alternative group Son Feci Bisiklet will be giving a concert as part of the Lokalize series at Zorlu PSM on June 16 with doors opening at 8:30pm. Having hit the scene four years ago and subsequently releasing their first EP, the Ankara-based group is known for their energetic live performances. Tickets available at biletix.com.

Zorlu PSM
16 June

End Date: 

Friday, June 16, 2017 - 14:15

Event Places : 

Asena Akan Quintet

05 May
8:00pm - 9:30pm

The Asena Akan Quintet will perform at Akbank Sanat on June 7 at 8pm. Accomplished vocalist Akan, Senova Ülker on trumpet, Tolga Bedir on keyboard, bassist Volkan Hürsever, and drummer Riccardo Marenghi will perform songs from their albums İstanbul’un İzleri (Traces of Istanbul) and Golden Heart as well as favorites from Brazilian jazz

Akbank Sanat
07 June

End Date: 

Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 21:30

Event Places : 

Contemporary Vocal Days: Barbershop Istanbul

05 May
8:00pm - 9:30pm

Akbank Sanat presents Istanbul Barbershop, Turkey first barbershop quartet as part of its Contemporary Vocal Days concert series on May 30 at 8pm. Kaan Bayır, Erdinç Hasılcıoğulları, Onur Zorluuysal, and Enis Turhan have brought the uniquely American a capella genre with its roots in the late nineteenth century to Turkey.

Akbank Sanat
30 May

End Date: 

Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 21:30

Event Places : 

Büyük Ev Ablukada

05 May
4:00pm - 6:00pm

As part of the Lokalize series, Büyük Ev Ablukada will be performing two acoustic shows of the concert series, Ay Şuram Ağrıyo (Oh it Hurts Here) at Zorlu PSM on May 27, one at 4pm and one at 6pm. Büyük Ev Ablukada always promises colorful live performances with audience interaction and various other surprises. Tickets available at biletix.com.

Zorlu PSM
27 May

End Date: 

Saturday, May 27, 2017 - 18:00

Event Places : 

Recent Latin American Cinema: El Premio

05 May
3:00pm - 5:00pm

Peruvian director Alberto Duran’s 2009 film, El Premio (The Prize) will be screened at Akbank Sanat on May 27 at 3pm. The film focuses on Antonio, who wins the lottery and travels to Lima to collect his winnings and see his son Alex, whom he has not seen in 10 years. Events unfold that will change the lives of all those involved. Admission is free of charge and invitations will be distributed at the information desk starting at 2pm until capacity is reached.

Akbank Sanat
27 May

End Date: 

Saturday, May 27, 2017 - 17:00

Event Places : 

Souq Sayfiye

05 May
11:30am - 8:00pm

Souq Dükkan is holding a shopping festival to prepare for summer at its store in Kanyon shopping center starting on May 25 at 11:30am and running until May 26 at 8pm. Souq is celebrating its fourth year by offering everything you need for summer: bikinis and bathing suits, sandals, t-shirts, and accessories from carefully selected brands and designers all under one roof.

Souq Dükkan
25 May

End Date: 

Friday, May 26, 2017 - 20:00

Event Category: 

Event Places : 

Royal Opera House screening: Jewels

05 May
7:00pm - 10:00pm

A screening of the Royal Ballet’s performance of acclaimed American choreographer George Balanchine’s Jewels at the Royal Opera House will be held at Zorlu PSM on May 26 at 7pm, commemorating its 50th year. Each part of the three-act, abstract ballet—the first of its kind—is inspired by a different gemstone and set to music by different composers. The first act, Emeralds, it set to music by Fuaré, the second, Rubies, is set to Stravinsky’s Capriccio, and the final act, Diamonds, is set to Tchaikovsky’s Third Symphony. Tickets available at biletix.com.

Zorlu PSM
26 May

End Date: 

Friday, May 26, 2017 - 22:00

Event Places : 

Panel: Save As

05 May
7:00pm - 8:30pm

SALT Research Architecture and Design Archive will be holding a series of talks, “Save As: Archiving Born-Digital Architectural Materials”, on the management of born-digital content at the SALT Galata Auditorium starting on May 24. The panelists: Suzanne Mulder, Annet Dekker, and Jan Knikker will speak on the issues and what needs to be done concerning the acquisition and management of the born-digital architecture collection as well as collaboration between those involved. Program begins at 7pm.

SALT Galata
24 May

End Date: 

Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 20:30

Event Places : 

7 'unusual' performances you shouldn't miss at the 45th Istanbul Music Festival

Joshua Bruce Allen
May 22, 2017

The Istanbul Music Festival is hosting its 45 year of classical concerts this year from May 29–June 21. Marking a high point in the city’s cultural calendar, the festival continues to bring world-class names to Istanbul as well as showcase the finest performers from Turkey. The theme of this year’s festival is “Unusual”, an apt adjective for this year’s venues: from the old Bomonti brewery to an Armenian church, the Galata Mevlevihane to the Süreyya Opera House, and Hagia Eirene Museum to Sait Halim Paşa Mansion. Here are some of the extraordinary artists that will be filling those venues with the sound of their music.

Mikhail Rudy – The Sound of Colours: Kandinsky & Chagall

Mikhail Rudy

Considered one of the top pianists worldwide, Mikhail Rudy has worked with renowned conductors such as Herbert von Karajan and Lorin Maazel. As well as producing over 30 recordings that have won many international awards, Rudy also engages with the visual arts in his music. His film based on the Kandinsky staging of Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition has been screened around the world, and he has collaborated with stop-motion filmmakers the Quay Brothers. His Istanbul Music Festival concert features his multimedia performances with animation and music combining into a synesthetic whole.

London Chamber Orchestra & Alina Pogostkina

London Chamber Orchestra

In this concert at Hagia Eirene Museum, Britain’s oldest professional chamber orchestra meets a young Russian violin star. Alina Pogostkina won the Sibelius Competition in 2005, and has previously performed with the BBC Philharmonic. The London Chamber Orchestra has an impressive list of premieres to its name from Stravinsky to Prokofiev. Together, the orchestra and the soloist will be performing an entire concert of Beethoven.

 “Rosery”

Rosery, Sokratis Sinopoulos

This concert in the garden of the Galata Mevlevihane is a meeting of a kemençe and a kemanche, the Istanbul type and the Persian type, respectively. Derya Türkan and Sokratis Sinopoulos represent Istanbul while Kayhan Kalhor and Ali Bahrami Fard represent Iran. Each of these musicians is a master in their own right, making this congregation a thrilling event for lovers of Turkish and Persian classical musics.

Music Route

Sait Halim Paşa Yalısı - Music Route

From 9am–5pm, guests at this event will go on a journey through time, space, and sound in Yeniköy, a picturesque neighborhood on the European Bosphorus shore. The day begins with a talk by historian Mert Taner on Yeniköy’s churches and the iconic Sait Halim Paşa Mansion. Then throughout the day, different concerts take place at an Armenian church, Sait Halim Paşa Mansion, two Greek churches, and the Austrian Cultural Center.

Şimdi Ensemble – Eternal Love

The Grand Bazaar

Şimdi Ensemble is a group of virtuoso musicians who give contemporary interpretations to Sufi music and hymns and also compose their own songs inspired by this tradition. Turkish harpist Şirin Pancaroğlu and Roma darbuka maestro Hamdi Akatay are two of the stars of this ensemble, which will be playing in the atmospheric setting of the Grand Bazaar.

Philip Glass – 11th Symphony premiere

Philip Glass

The festival co-commissioned leading contemporary composer Philip Glass’ 11th Symphony, which premiered at New York’s Carnegie Hall. This symphony has an emphasis on percussion as well as large parts for the tuba, and continues the composer’s work with tonal music.

Vienna Chamber Orchestra & Fazıl Say

Vienna Chamber Orchestra

The festival’s closing concert pairs celebrated Turkish pianist Fazıl Say with the Vienna Chamber Orchestra, which has hosted Yehudi Menuhin as a guest conductor. The concert program draws on three icons of classical music: Beethoven, Mozart, and Mendelssohn. 

How the works of Mozart meet the Roma

Joshua Bruce Allen
May 22, 2017

Musician Hamdi AkatayThe Aegean port of İzmir is one of the most prosperous and developed cities in Turkey. But İzmir’s Tepecik neighborhood has a different story – this mainly Roma district is better known for poverty and crime. Hamdi Akatay, a Roma percussionist from Tepecik, is trying to offer something more hopeful to the youth, with a unique project: the Tepecik Philharmonic. Even more extraordinary, these young musicians combine Roma music with the works of Mozart.​

“One of the aims of this project is to protect young people from these evils through music,” Akatay says. “I spent my youth in Tepecik, and if I hadn’t started playing the darbuka then I might have been dealing drugs on the corner. I think music is a very therapeutic path.”

Akatay, having performed with famous names such as Tarkan, Sezen Aksu, and the Berlin Philharmonic, is a role model for the neighborhood. He is also the author of Universal Darbuka Method, the first handbook for Turkish rhythms on the darbuka. Akatay’s musicians are all classically trained, but it was not so easy for the folk of Tepecik to understand his project. “Being a Roma neighborhood, most people in Tepecik listen to arabesque or folk music,” said Akatay. “When we started rehearsing Mozart in the coffee house garden, local guys came and gave us strange looks. Later on they felt that soothing quality, the way Mozart transports you to another world, and they started sitting and listening with their tea. Of course, when we played medleys of Mozart and local music, people liked it even more.”

Perhaps the first question in listeners’ minds is, why Mozart? Classical aficionados will know Mozart’s “Rondo alla Turca,” which took inspiration from Turkish music. Orchestral instruments such as the bass drum, cymbals, and even the oboe came to Europe from the Middle East. Given that history, a Roma percussionist playing Mozart might be more natural than we imagine. “If he had been alive today, I think Mozart would have wanted to play with us,” Akatay told The Guide Istanbul. “In future we could extend this project to Bach, Tchaikovsky, or Beethoven. This is a long-term project – it might even last for centuries.”

The Tepecik Philharmonic is beginning work on its first album this year. Akatay’s dream is to perform his interpretations in Salzburg, the town where Mozart was born. His passion for the orchestra is clear: he says of his work, “There are two legacies I’m going to leave behind for my children and grandchildren: my darbuka method and the Tepecik Philharmonic.”

For news and concerts, follow Hamdi Akatay on Facebook.

Animatronic exhibition brings new perspective on modern Turkish society

Joshua Bruce Allen
May 22, 2017

Issues of identity and belonging are never far from the surface in Turkey, and have become one of the main themes for many contemporary artists. Serra Behar’s first solo show, To Remember, engages with society, personal history, and religion through 17 years of her work. Due to Behar’s training in fine arts, costumery, puppetry, and stage design, the theatrical aspects of group identity take center stage.

Behar’s issues with identity began at an early age as someone whose religious background did not fit the norm in Turkey. That in turn opened her eyes to the other categorizations that are common in this society. “Being Jewish in Turkey, you don’t belong to that community, but you also don’t belong anywhere,” she told The Guide Istanbul. “When you go abroad, they call you Turkish, so you don’t belong to them. When you come back here, they call you Jewish. Then they say, this is your team, Galatasaray, Fenerbahçe. There are tags everywhere. You’re an artist. You’re so apolitical. If you’re not left wing then you’re not one of us. That’s how I was raised, not by my family, who are very open-minded, but by the minds of everyone surrounding us.”

First Supper, Serra Behar

Looking at her personal experiences in the light of society, each of Behar’s works reflects a different stage in her life. “I’m not an artist of one subject. I work with the materials that help me express what I want to say at that particular time. It’s a way of trying to understand me actually, a kind of diary,” she says. The exhibition’s centerpiece is a wearable sculpture called Embryo/Belonging. Being able to enter the embryo sculpture, putting it on like a second skin, allows the artist to regress back to the first identity that she considers natural, rather than social or political.

Paradise Bird, Serra BeharBehar began her artistic training at Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University, an environment that personally she found toxic to her creativity. “I didn’t have any self esteem at the university because they put pressure on you and say you’re nothing. You feel so ordinary and miserable. The academics are like gods, and you just think, I hope he likes it. You’re always in front of a jury, like a Miss America stage. But you’re naked with your art, and they’re judging you. In that way you lose your self-esteem more and more,” she explains. The person who convinced her to finish her training there was Saim Bugay, a respected Turkish sculptor and puppet-maker.

Self-deception, Serra Behar

Behar was temporarily freed from the labels and hierarchy that she had experienced in Turkey when she traveled to the UK on the Erasmus program. This freedom informed her work Paradise Bird, an animatronic sculpture that is trying to break away from the cables and wires that tie it to the ground. 

“In Turkey, they tell you that you can’t be an artist until a certain age, or after a few exhibitions, or after your first solo show, or after working with a famous artist. But when I went to the UK, there were 18-year-old kids saying hey, I’m an artist. I was very excited by the joy that they felt in calling themselves artists. So I said, yeah, I’m an artist too, and I’ll produce more,’” she recalls.

Later on, Behar’s soul-searching led her to investigate various spiritual and self-development courses. Her cynicism about the financial motives of these courses informed her work Self-Deception. The leather angel on top of the box reaches up to heaven, but the coin-operated mechanism only gives it a slight lift, and the coin drops on the floor.

The work Organ Inc. grew out of the artist’s interest and concern in factory farming and genetic engineering. Behar created fliers for a fictitious company, Organ Inc., that grows replacement human organs in the bodies of pigs. Her motive was to show that despite our talk of animal rights, most people would accept such an organ to save themselves or a loved one. The sculpture’s skeleton is made from a mixture of real animal bones, such as cow, sheep, and chicken. Three leather hearts pump with animatronic motion while oinking sounds emanate from a hidden speaker. At the time of making the sculpture, this kind of organ production was not a real phenomenon, but as Behar explains, “About two or three years later, I saw in a magazine that they were actually growing human organs in pigs.” To Remember is on display at Adahan İstanbul from May 23–June 20.

Organ Inc. - Serra Behar

How to have the ultimate Istanbul experience during Turkish Airlines Euroleague

Caner Kocamaz
May 17, 2017

Luigi Datome, photo courtesy of Euroleague BasketballBringing Europe’s best basketball teams together, Turkish Airlines EuroLeague finals are in Istanbul this year. The final games between the best four teams in the Final Four are in Istanbul for the second time after five years. Istanbul-based Turkish teams Darüşşafaka Doğuş, Fenerbahçe, and Anadolu Efes are among the final eight teams that competed for a spot in the Final Four, which take place from May 19–21.

From their first impressions of Istanbul to their favorite restaurants in the city right now, we got to know the non-Turkish players on three of the Istanbul-based teams and learned their tips for first-timers to the city. This is Anadolu Efes’ Alex Kirk’s first year in Istanbul and he is amazed by the culture around him. “It’s a different culture from New Mexico, where I grew up, and China and Italy,” where he has been lately. Fenerbahçe’s Luigi Datome had some problems with Turkish at the beginning, yet he is astonished by the visual smorgasbord Istanbul offers, saying that the “landscapes are breathtaking” and that he “fell in love with the city at first sight.”

With much of their time taken up by the busy schedules of the Turkish Basketball League and Euroleague, the players do not get a lot of free time, but when they do they eat out and explore the city. “I go to Galata and Kadıköy to explore new places, have a cup of coffee in Karaköy, and walk in the streets,” Datome says of his free days. The players also seem to be caught up with the SaltBae sensation as well. Both Datome and Darüşşafaka Doğuş’s Scottie Wilbekin’s favorite restaurant is Nusr-et.

Istanbul through players’ eyes

Now that Kirk, Datome, and Wilbekin are living in Istanbul, it is their chance to show first-comers around the city. Kirk’s parents were in town a couple of weeks ago. He told the Guide Istanbul, “The first thing we did was to take a tram through the city.” Starting out from Kabataş and going through the Old City, the tram is a good and fast way to start exploring the city. “Getting on the water and seeing the city from the water” opens up another window through the city as well. Datome also recommends first-timers to the city visit the Old City and Sultanahmet, Hagia Sophia, the Blue Mosque and the Balat neighborhood. He also suggests “tasting the Istanbul food.” Wilbekin, on the other hand, says first-timers should “visit Nusr-et to see SaltBae.”

See our list of top 7 Istanbul museums

Eat at the restaurants of Istanbul's best chefs

Drink at the bars of best mixologists in Istanbul

Alex Kirk, photo courtesy of Euroleague Basketball

Favorites

Alex Kirk’s favorite landmark: Grand Bazaar
Alex Kirk’s favorite outdoor space to workout: Bebek
Luigi Datome’s favorite neighborhoods: Karaköy and Balat
Luigi Datome’s favorite landmark: Bosphorus Bridge
Scottie Wilbekin’s favorite restaurant: Nusr-et

Fenerbahçe’s time to shine

Out of three Istanbul teams, Fenerbahçe qualified to be in the Final Four. Fenerbahçe’s Datome is thrilled for “the opportunity to play against all these teams and for the long journey until the Final Four.” The team will play Real Madrid on May 19 at 8:30pm at Sinan Erdem Dome. The winner of this game will compete for the championship with either CSKA Moscow or Olympiacos, depending on the result of the game on May 19 at 5:30pm. The championship game is on Sunday, May 21 at 9pm. In Turkey, TRT Spor will broadcast all games live on TV.

Zorlu PSM will be screening EuroLeague games on May 19: 6:30pm for CSKA Moscow vs. Olympiacos, 9:30pm for Fenerbahçe vs. Real Madrid; May 21: 6pm for the game for the third place and the championship game at 9pm. After the second game on Friday night, there will be a party with music from the ‘70s, to the ‘90s.

Scottie Wilbekin, photo courtesy of Euroleague Basketball

A festival-like weekend is coming up

Before the games start, there are a slew of other fun activities taking place around the sports complex. FanZone activities include a concert by Manga, three-on-three basketball tournaments, and much more. Euroleague legends of previous years will play in exhibition games and hold autograph sessions as well. Check the events schedule for the dates and times for the events on the Euroleague website.

Fans will also be able to watch the games with virtual reality glasses on Euroleague.net after the games end. One of the referees for the games will wear special equipment that will record the game and allow fans to experience it as if they were on the court.

Şirin Pancaroğlu revives the lost Turkish harp

Joshua Bruce Allen
May 16, 2017

For many of us, the sound of the harp recalls images of cherubs in heavenly clouds, or classical concert halls. But Turkey’s foremost harpist Şirin Pancaroğlu takes the sound both forward and backward in time, using an Ottoman harp in her album Çengnağme and also collaborating with electronic composer Erdem Helvacıoğlu. On June 4 she will be performing at the Istanbul Music Festival as part of her group Şimdi Ensemble. Adding a historic setting to the rich character of the music, this concert will take place in a street of the Grand Bazaar.

Şirin Pancaroğlu - photo by Utku Dervent

Though she entered the classical conservatory at age 11, Pancaroğlu did not turn to the Turkish tradition until later in life. “At first it felt like going back to primary school. I began with very accomplished musicians, and I couldn’t do anything but watch with my mouth open,” she told The Guide Istanbul. “But in Turkish music there is a concept called meşk, which means learning by playing with masters. It’s a bit like learning to cook – you have to follow the cook carefully and then try for yourself.” With the help of traditional musicians, she soon adapted to the spirit, even performing a 45-minute improvisation with cellist Rebecca Foon at the Cappadox Festival.

In her decades with the harp, Pancaroğlu has discovered its various versions across the continents. The Ottoman harp, or çeng, can be seen in Ottoman miniatures from the 16th century. However, Ottoman craftsmen stopped making the çeng around 500 years ago. It was not until the early 2000s that one was reconstructed for Pancaroğlu, making her one of the very few musicians today to take on the ancient instrument.

One guest musician on the latest Şimdi Ensemble album, Eternal Love, is French tuba player Michel Godard, whose jazz virtuosity blends with the Turkish ensemble surprisingly well. Composer and vocalist Bora Uymaz gives intense interpretations of the Sufi lyrics, some of which date from the 13th century. Behind it all, Volkan Ergen’s percussion creates swishing caravans and throbbing veins of mystical meaning. As Pancaroğlu explains, “We weren’t trying to do very traditional Sufi music in that group. TRT [the national television channel] sometimes plays Sufi music when there is a tragic event in the country, so the music can seem very heavy and mournful. But there are ancient lessons in the lyrics of this music, and we decided to protect that while giving the music a new form.” Her next project is a solo album of Ottoman and Turkish classical music with an expected release date in 2017.

Stay up to date with upcoming concerts at www.sirinpancaroglu.com

Top 7 burgers in Istanbul

May 16, 2017

 

A good hamburger is more than just a bun and patty. With quality meat, homemade buns, and special recipes, these places seem to have perfected their burger game. If you are looking for something more elegant but still as tasty as the ultimate late-night food, ıslak (wet) hamburger, head to one of these joints.

Burgerhood, Teşvikiye - photo by Merve Göral 

Burgerhood

Burgerhood’s motto is “original taste for real burger lovers”, and the corner-joint in Teşvikiye meets expectations. You can go for the classic or cheeseburger from the six signature burgers on offer or pick one of the more creative renditions that up the ante with ingredients like Swiss cheese or Roquefort. Each burger comes with truffle fries. Hacı Emin Efendi Sokak No.24/E, Teşvikiye; T: (0212) 234 63 03

Marotiri

Opened late last year in Bomonti, Marotiri is a venture from the minds behind But First Coffee. Done up like a chic eatery, the restaurant’s burger menu is not long, but covers all the essentials with local twists. The secret to their burgers is the quality meat that comes from their own farm in Adapazarı. The Marotiri Bazlama Burger is a lighter option with bazlama in place of a bun. Afterward you can order coffee from next-door neighbor But First Coffee. Feriköy Fırın Sokak No.5/9A, Bomonti; T: (0212) 343 02 07

Jimmy's Burger

Jimmy’s Burger is a hole-in-the- wall in İstinye, yet there is one burger on the menu that is worth the trip even from the farthest corner of the city. The casual burger joint’s Tereyağlı Burger (butter burger) is dense and buttery with a homemade bun and juicy patty. Koru Caddesi No.7, İstinye; T: 0534 812 48 46

Black Angus

Tucked away between stores in Tophane, Black Angus is a steak and burger house that you have probably passed dozens of times and never noticed. Next time you are on Boğazkesen Caddesi, follow the smell of freshly baked hamburger buns blending with the aroma of well-seasoned meat. The restaurant has a variety of burgers, including one with sucuk (Turkish sausage), but go for the Black Burger Alaturka for a mix of a Turkish take on the classic burger format. Boğazkesen Caddesi No.19/1, Tophane; T: (0212) 806 62 04

Akali

Akali revamped its menu to serve only hamburgers, and we are quite pleased about it. The standard hamburger comes with cheddar cheese, pickles, and pickled onion. You can also add delicious ingredients like avocado cream or bacon to create your own special hamburger. Dibekçi Sokak No.11/A, Beşiktaş; T: (0212) 227 42 42

Nusr-Et Burger, Nişantaşı

Nusr-Et Burger

Nusr-et’s precision when it comes to meat—and salt-sprinkling—is a world phenomenon now. You can taste the quality from the first bite. Nusr-et has two burger options: Nusr-et Burger and the Lokum Burger. If you are looking for something different, go for Lokum Burger, which has pieces of beef tenderloin in place of a patty. Milli Reasürans Pasajı, Abdi İpekçi Caddesi No.57/A, Nişantaşı; T: (0212) 231 24 70

Kasabım Cihangir

Sourcing from one of Cihangir’s oldest traders, Kasabım Ethane, a butcher that has been around for more than 50 years, Kasabım Restaurant’s Fümeli Burger is a carnivore's dream, with the patty topped with smoked deli beef. The restaurant’s steaks are also top-notch. Şimşirci Sokak No.4/A, Cihangir; T: (0212) 251 25 75

Bonus: Burger Wars by Burger Lab

Calling all meat lovers and ground beef sandwich enthusiasts: Burger Lab will be holding the finals for its fifth annual Burger Wars competition at UNIQ in Maslak on May 24. The theme for this year’s competition is Turkey’s regional cheeses, with the motto “The Best Meat, the Best Burger”. A jury of food and drink professionals will crown the tastiest burger recipe. The night will be topped off with an after party and concert. For more info go to www.burgersavaslari.com. Tickets available at biletix.com

Where to have Mother’s Day brunch in Istanbul this Sunday

May 12, 2017

An elegant bouquet from the best florists in Istanbul, a lovely gift from The Guide Shop, a delightful brunch, and an exhilarating visit to the spa may not repay all that our mothers have done for us, but it will surely pamper her this Sunday. Take a look at our list of suggestions from around the city before you make plans for Mother’s Day.

Martinez Istanbul

Hudson and Martinez Istanbul

Arnavutköy’s hip restaurant Hudson and newly opened Martinez Istanbul are dedicating their Sunday brunch to mothers. A DJ and live saxophone will accompany Hudson’s brunch and both restaurants will have some surprises for mothers as well.

Mittag

Mittag

Mittag’s Mother’s Day brunch offers fresh spring greens, sugar-free desserts with seasonal fruits, refreshing salads, and dishes with regional produce from all over Turkey as well as eggs and homemade pastries.

Zuma brunch

Zuma

If your mom fancies Japanese cuisine, Zuma’s regular brunch would be an ideal fit for Mother’s Day this year. Spice it up a bit with craft cocktails from the restaurant’s bar.

Çırağan Palace Kempinski Istanbul

Treat your mother with a lavish night accommodation at the Çırağan Palace on May 13, along with a 40 minute massage at the spa. Then treat her to the Mother’s Day brunch offered the next day along with a beautiful bouquet to truly show your mother your appreciation. T: (0212) 326 46 46

Raffles Istanbul brunch

Raffles Istanbul Zorlu Center

Have a feast with Flapper Swings’ live performance and Raffles Istanbul’s rich brunch menu with seafood, pizzas cooked a stone oven, homemade pasta, and much more on Mother’s Day. Champagne and a special cocktail from Long Bar are included in the prix fixe menu.
How much? 225 TL

Hilton Istanbul Bomonti Mother's Day brunch

Hilton Istanbul Bomonti

If you have a foodie mom, spoiling her with a picnic-style brunch on Mother’s Day would be a great way to celebrate. Hilton Istanbul Bomonti has thought of everything, from an open buffet with sushi and risotto to chic bouquets by Parla Flower beside that cute picnic basket. Give your mother an experience filled with good food and quality time this year. From May 8–14, book your mother a spa day, which has been extended from 50 minutes to 90 minutes as a Mother’s Day special. T: (0212) 375 30 00

How much? Brunch 145 TL, Spa 249 TL

Sait Halim Paşa Yalısı

Right by the Bosphorus, Sait Halim Paşa Yalısı is offering mothers a chic brunch with live music this year. Take your mom to the historic mansion and enjoy the food accompanied by a live jazz performance. T: (0212) 223 05 66
How much? 195 TL

Hyatt Regency Istanbul Ataköy

Kids will prepare brunch for their moms this Mother’s Day at Brizo Restaurant under the supervision of the restaurant’s chefs. T: (0212) 463 13 30

Conrad Istanbul

Conrad Istanbul offers a great 40 percent discount discount for mothers on all spa massages, using French Charm D’Orient’s spa and care products. Pamper your mother with a 90-minute massage this Mother’s Day. Along with these offers, Conrad Istanbul has prepared a Mother’s Day brunch at Manzara Restaurant. T: (0212) 310 25 25

Feriye Palace

Feriye Palace’s Executive Chef Aydın Demir will prepare a lovely brunch this Mother’s Day. Join the brunch with your mother on May 14, from 10am–3pm for a spread of omelettes, a pasta station, barbeque, sweets, and ice cream. T: 0538 483 20 21
How much? 175 TL.

Fire of Anatolia: 15th Year Show

05 May
9:00pm - 11:00pm

The Fire of Anatolia (Anadolu Ateşi) dance troupe is celebrating its fifteenth year with a special show at İstiklal's Grand Pera Emek Stage. Since its founding in 1999, Fire of Anatolia has toured through 97 countries, with over 4,000 live performances, carrying Turkey's culture of music and dance around the world. This fifteenth-year show will feature a larger number of performers, with three generations of the show's talented dancers. Tickets from Biletix.

29 May

End Date: 

Monday, May 29, 2017 - 14:00

Event Category: 

Rezonans Choir

05 May
8:00pm - 11:00pm

Founded in 2010 by Burak Onur Erdem, the Rezonans choir quickly became one of the best-known Turkish choirs both at home and internationally. The choir represented Turkey at Europe's largest choral festival, the Europa Cantat Festival. As the first Turkish choir to enter the Cork International Fleischmann Trophy competition, the choir returned to Turkey with the second prize. This concert at İstiklal's Grand Pera Emek Stage will take a German-Romantic theme, with compositions by Felix Mendelssohn, Johannes Brahms, Robert Schumann, and Josef Rheinberger. Tickets are available from Biletino

15 May

End Date: 

Monday, May 15, 2017 - 13:15

Event Category: 

Viktoria Mullova

05 May
9:00pm - 11:00pm

World-renowned violin virtuoso Viktoria Mullova is playing in the atmospheric setting of the Hagia Irene Museum, on the grounds of Topkapı Palace. This concert will strongly feature pieces by J. S. Bach, as well as pieces from Prokofiev, George Benjamin, and Dai Fujikura. Mullova has been called "the world's greatest living violin virtuoso", particularly for her performances and recordings of Bach. This concert is a highlight of the year's classical calendar in Istanbul. Tickets are from Biletix.

15 May

End Date: 

Monday, May 15, 2017 - 18:00

Event Category: 

Event Places : 

Bouzouki Orhan: Balkan Express

05 May
10:00pm - 1:00am

Headlining this Balkan fest is Orhan Osman, a German-born Turk who learned his bouzouki skills in Greece. Osman has played to audiences across Europe, as well as with respected Turkish musicians such as Hüsnü Şenlendirici. His bouzouki repertoire includes Greek and Balkan melodies as well as Turkish pop and folk music. This concert at garajistanbul promises a night of infectious rhythm and rapid melodies. Tickets are from Biletix.

12 May

End Date: 

Friday, May 12, 2017 - 17:45

Event Category: 

Event Places : 

Norm Ender

05 May
9:30pm - 12:00am

One of the hottest voices of Turkish rap, Norm Ender, is coming to perform at Babylon Bomonti on May 11. His first album İçinde Patlar came out in 2000, and he's now performing material from his latest album Aura. All of the arragements, lyrics, and music on this album are produced by Norm Ender, marking a new stage in his career. Tickets from Biletix.

11 May

End Date: 

Thursday, May 11, 2017 - 17:45

Event Category: 

Event Places : 

Beth Hart

05 May
8:00pm - 11:00pm

As part of Zorlu PSM's Jazz Festival, American singer Beth Hart is coming to enchant Istanbul with her jazz, soul, and blues stylings. Hart came to fame in the 90s, appearing alongside guitar legends such as Jeff Beck and Slash. Her album with Joe Bonamassa, Don't Explain, earned her a Grammy nomination, while her 2015 single "Mechanical Heart" topped the music lists. Appearances on the Jools Holland show, and at the Royal Albert Hall and the Barbican Center, have proved popular. Hart's 2016 album Fire on the Floor keeps up the pace. Tickets from Biletix.

10 May

End Date: 

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 17:30

Event Category: 

Event Places : 

For the love of Istanbul: imagining history with Muhittin Bayram

Joshua Bruce Allen
May 10, 2017

When choosing the name of his website, Muhittin Bayram could have chosen something simpler – Old Istanbul, for example. Instead he chose Hayalleme, which means “imagining.” This reminds us that our view of the past is always framed by the present, colored by our own nostalgia and prejudices. More than just photos of old Istanbul, Bayram's website offers a meditation on our place in history.

Hayalleme, Muhittin Bayram

Born in Greece, Bayram moved with his family to Istanbul at a young age. “We moved into an old wooden house in Beşiktaş. I fell in love with that old Istanbul feeling there,” he told The Guide Istanbul. Professionally, Bayram earns his living as a computer programmer, and began to learn more about the city during an assignment that required photographs from modern Istanbul. “That gave me a better opportunity to wander the streets. On those walks I started wondering who else had walked those streets before," he says. "Then I came across some old photographs and started comparing the old views with the same places today. Then I started searching for photos of specific places in the digital archives. Finally this curiosity took me to the secondhand merchants to look for old photos there.”

New media for old times

This quest for old photographs needed a public outlet, which Bayram created in his website Hayalleme.com and promoted through Twitter. He benefited from fortunate timing on social media. “Certainly there were Istanbul photo collectors before me, and in previous generations. But Twitter was a new medium. Earlier on you couldn’t share photos on Twitter, only the link. I started doing this just at the time when Twitter started letting you share photos directly. It drew a lot of interest, because most people didn’t know these old Istanbul photos or where to find them.”

One technique that has set Bayram apart from other photo collectors is his old-new montages. After studying an old photo, he goes to the same spot and takes a new photo from the same angle. By pasting the old and new photographs together he highlights the changes that have happened over the years.

Muhittin Bayram, HayallemeHis network of secondhand merchants lets him know whenever an interesting or valuable photograph comes into their shops. But even with these contacts, he has had worries that the stock of photos will not last long. “Actually I didn’t have that many photos at that time – close to two thousand. They were going to run out, but as people were interested I thought it should continue for longer,” he says. His discovery of foreign archives such as the American Library of Congress increased his collection significantly. Turkish archives such as SALT and the Sabancı Museum are also valuable resources, and Atatürk Library has recently placed its digital archives online.

The price of change

Of course, not all photos are equal in historical or monetary value. “Personal photos are more precious in my view. They might be photos that no-one [outside the family] has seen before. If there’s a famous person in the photo then of course it becomes much more valuable. If there is writing on the back, or if the photo is from a famous photography studio, then that adds value too,” he explains. The writing on the back of photos and postcards offers a personal context to the nameless images, and the messages can sometimes be surprising. “I remember one photo that had ‘Me and my car’ written on the back. The picture was of a man posing on his car,” Bayram laughs.

As the car photo shows, Bayram’s collection is not only concerned with permanent landmarks, such as buildings. It is possible to date his photographs quite accurately by observing the style of hats, clothes, cars, typefaces, and products. “A photo of the Hagia Sophia today and one from a century ago aren’t really different. The people in front of it change,” he says. “There’s something philosophical about it actually. You see how ephemeral we are – at one time some people were living here and now they’re gone. But we behave very selfishly, although we’re only on this earth for an insignificant amount of time.”

This selfishness also has an impact on the urban landscape. Sometimes it is not possible for Bayram to take a photo from the same angle as a photographer from 100 years ago, because new buildings have covered the view. “Everyone complains about all the tall concrete buildings being built, but given an opportunity everyone wants to do it. People look at the old photos and say, ‘Ah, how beautiful it was.’ Then they turn around and think, ‘I wish my granddad had bought that land and built on it.’”

Stay up to date with Bayram’s posts on www.hayalleme.com or on Twitter at @hayalleme.

Best foodie pop-ups in Istanbul

May 10, 2017

Foodie networks keep the culinary scene vibrant and add some creativeness to the milieu by taking food out of the restaurant and bringing people together on a regular basis. If you are looking to explore new pairings and flavors while meeting like-minded foodies, get a head start with these foodie pop-up events.

Yeme İçme İşleri

Yeme İçme İşleri

Founded by four foodies, Alican and Yiğit Akdemir Thomas Fellows, and Enis Güven, Yeme İçme İşleri (Food and Drink Works) is holding themed food and drink pairing events in
many locations around the city, highlighting complementary pairs like pecans with a stout beer. Follow their Instagram or website to hear about their next event. instagram.com/yemeicmeisleri; yemeicmeisleri.com

Wondercats pop-up

“Every dinner has a story,”
say those behind Wondercats Pop-Up. A mysterious dining experience, this popup takes place at locations that are disclosed 24 hours before the event. Chefs Sinan Budeyri and Emirhan Paralı prepare five- or six-course menus that go with themed events—their latest theme was “a night at the museum” and took place at the Istanbul Toy Museum. Follow their Instagram closely, as seating for these events is limited and tickets tend to sell out in minutes. instagram.com/wondercats.popup

Drinknbite

As you can understand from its name, Drinknbite focuses on food and drink pairings at various locations around town such as Suvla Kanyon and the International Wine & Spirits Academy (IWSA). Wines from Thrace and Anatolia nd their best matches from world cuisines such as ceviche from as far afield as Latin America. Keep checking @drinknbite on Instagram for the next event. instagram.com/drinknbite

Communeaty

Communeaty

The brainchild of Boğaziçi University student Gamze Büyükgüzel, The Communeaty is a foodie network bringing together fine dining aficionados who want to meet new people and share their passion. If you want to be a part of this network, sign up for the
next event on their website. instagram.com/thecommuneaty; thecommuneaty.com

Eataway

Think of Eataway as the Airbnb of dining. You can either become a host and showcase your cooking or join a local cook’s table to experience their home-cooked food. Eataway has a list of cities around the globe that have this network from the US to Germany. If you are traveling soon and want to taste what the locals eat, take a look at their website. eataway.com

Hands-On Permaculture Design Course

05 May

For those wanting to reduce their carbon footprint by growing their own produce in the city, this 72-hour permaculture course offers full knowledge and training of the techniques. Course leader Shaul Shaham is the resident permaculturist at Ek Biç Ye İç and Narköy, joined by molecular biologist and geneticist İdil Akdos to teach all the elements of permaculture, including visits to organic farms around Istanbul. To book a place, contact pdc@ekbicyeic.com. For more details see the course's website.

19 May

End Date: 

Sunday, July 23, 2017 - 13:00

Event Category: 

Design on Tomtom Street

05 May

Beyoğlu's Tomtom Kaptan Sokak is home to four days of art, design, and shopping on May 11-14. This multidisciplinary festival will also host yoga and breathing workshops, a group exhibition, local cuisine, dance shows, and live music, turning it into a real street festival. The range of design items on offer means this is an excellent opportunity to find a unique gift for Mother's Day on May 14. Find out more on the event's website.

11 May

End Date: 

Sunday, May 14, 2017 - 14:00

Event Category: 

Istanbul Lettuce Festival in Yedikule

05 May

The Marul Bayramı (Lettuce Festival) is a celebration of the famous Yedikule lettuce, grown in these urban gardens whose history goes back to the Byzantine era. This breed of lettuce is particularly tall and oily, making a healthy meal in itself. This celebration will be accompanied by the Cümbüş Cemaat band in the Yedikule gardens by the Byzantine city walls. Whether you're a gastronome or a party-goer, this daytime festival shows another side to old Istanbul. Read The Guide Istanbul's article on the famous Yedikule lettuce and follow the Facebook page for more updates.

03 June

End Date: 

Sunday, June 4, 2017 - 12:30

Event Category: 

Event Places : 

Orlando Carlo Calumeno Collection & Archives

Private museums are a major player in Istanbul’s cultural scene, but their owners often make their careers in industries quite different from art. Orlando Carlo Calumeno has done something similar, though on a smaller scale, in his Teşvikiye shop, Orlando Carlo Calumeno Collection & Archives. While continuing as an executive board member at Net Holding, Calumeno has also collected countless objects from 19th- and 20th-century Turkey.

Calumeno is owner of the world’s largest archive of Ottoman postcards, with over 20,000 that he has collected during his lifetime. A selection was displayed at the Tophane-i Amire exhibition With the Intention of Pomegranate: It's Not Time to Forget but to Remember in March 2016. This exhibition focused on the shared culture of Turks and Armenians in Anatolia, and Calumeno’s collection shows the full range of languages, religions, and ethnicities that made up the Ottoman cultural landscape.

However, the collection goes far beyond postcards, from antique rugs and portraits to metal safes, shaving equipment, weapons, Istanbul guidebooks in several languages, tobacco boxes, ceramics, silver ornaments, advertisements, metal signs, and all manner of personal items from the late Ottoman period. At that time even the simplest objects were branded in at least three languages – usually Ottoman Turkish, Greek, and Armenian – which shows that cosmopolitanism was a part of everyday life. Whether you intend to find a unique souvenir or simply stare at the fascinating antiques, visitors are welcome to come and explore the city’s past.

The store is located in Hak Pasajı, one of the hidden treasures of Teşvikiye. This arcade manages to maintain an old-time feel that has been lost in many of the city’s shopping areas – antiques stores, boutique stationers, jewelers, and shoemakers continue their specialty trades at a more leisurely pace than the crowded avenues outside.

(0212) 246 19 07
  • Teşvikiye
9:30am - 6:30pm
Monday
Saturday

Address: 

Hak Pasajı, No.22 Teşvikiye Caddesi, Lower floor No.4-5 & 15-16

Google Map: 

Map Location: 

41.051409, 28.992013

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No LaB: Turkish street culture meets art and design

Joshua Bruce Allen
May 05, 2017

No LaB first burst onto the Istanbul scene with Modern Africa / A Rainbow Nation, showing a new face of art and design from Africa. Now with their second exhibition, the women behind No LaB, Ala Onur and Zeynep Ercan, believe that Turkish street culture is ready for a contemporary twist. 

The new exhibition, Made in Türkiye, brings together local and foreign artists to highlight the distinctive features of life on Istanbul’s streets. “Around the world, street culture is becoming very mainstream—restaurants are doing street food, and design is using street fashion. But in Turkey, instead of taking inspiration from our own culture, we still take it from the West,” Onur says, with Ercan adding, “We’re focusing on what the future is for Turkey in art and culture.”

Ercan and Onur have found a unique venue in the Hasköy Wool Yarn Factory, an old industrial space that is now used for cultural events. Since takılma (hanging out) is such a part of Istanbul’s street life, Made in Türkiye includes an area to hang out and drink coffee in the factory courtyard.

Pınar Yeğin

Pınar Yeğin has become known as half of the design duo Rumisu, whose whimsical textiles have enchanted Istanbul. For No LaB, she has tried her hand at a new material: ceramics. The name of this collection is Ağır Abiler, which translates as “tough guys” or “bad asses”. There are moustaches galore, but the birds and floral borders suggest that these guys are not so tough after all.

Beril Ateş

Illustrator Beril Ateş produced this colorful map of Istanbul for Hong Kong magazine Victionary. Landmarks merge with food, drink, sport, street characters, and local products in this contemporary version of the Ottoman miniature style. See more of Ateş’s distinctive work at her website.

Aman Khanna

New Delhi-based artist Aman Khanna produced a special range of her Claymen sculptures, inspired by Istanbul. The round figures with conical hats draw on the traditional clothes of the Mevlevi dervishes who have become a symbol of Turkey. Khanna’s aim in these pieces is to show the existential crises of common people in an age when “man is losing his humanity and becoming a thing amongst the things he produces.”

Sinem Yıldırım

Sinem Yıldırım draws on the aesthetic of Turkish kitsch in these textile works. The mass-produced carpets are embellished with glitzy strings that highlight the absurdity of the images, which depict an orientalist fantasy of reclining women and a romanticized forest scene.

Pınar Akkurt

The name of this work is Bit Pazarı (Flea Market). Istanbul has a number of large flea markets, such as the Dolapdere market on every Sunday. Artist Pınar Akkurt has taken items that are typical of Turkish culture such as Turkish coffee pots, teapots, hammam bowls, tea trays, and portable barbecues and had them flattened with a machine. In this way they seem to be preserved like a museum collection.

Amit Baruch

London-based artist Amit Baruch took inspiration from Istanbul’s gecekondu (shanty) houses, examining the classic objects and furnishings inside these hastily built homes. He then exaggerated these features to a surreal degree—there is a column made of teapots and hookah bowls, a broom with a hookah pipe for a handle, and an incongruously large plasma TV in the corner. On the walls are his photo-textile collage portraits.

See Made in Türkiye at Hasköy Eski Yün İplik Fabrikası, Kırmızı Minare Sokak No.3, Hasköy, until June 10.

Pottery making in Cappadocia: the relationship of the river and clay

May 05, 2017

The ease of navigation around a town, that is divided by a river makes visitors adapt to the new location much faster. They quickly learn distinctive markers of each bank, finding the best spots preferred by locals and making them their own. This is the case of Kızılırmak, Turkey’s longest river running entirely within the borders of the country, and which splits the Cappadocian town of Avanos into two sides. It is on the banks of the river where the town’s social life blooms, but its meaning goes beyond the atmosphere of the walking paths, lively cafes, and cozy waterfront benches. The locals’ relationship with Kızılırmak dates back to the Bronze Age, when the Hittite Empire occupied the areas directly surrounding the watershed, using its natural resources in many different ways. In Avanos, it was all about pottery.

Utilizing earth, sun and fire

Clay used to make pottery is a mixture of hard clay resources found in the mountains surrounding Avanos, and the softer ones taken directly from the Kızılırmak riverbed. Since it is not possible to produce quality pottery using only one type of clay (as it would crumble during the process), a special red paste that takes its color from local soil, is made using both types.

The paste is kneaded by hand to remove lumps and, once soft, left to rest for a day. The next day, using a foot-driven wheel, craftsmen shape their clay into objects which are then left for a short rest in the sun. Only then are handles added. If the initial object is left in the sun for too long, there is a chance the handles might not adhere. 

Chez Galip - photo by Merve Göral

Next, the surface of some of the objects is painted. Traditionally, yoşa (natural red dye) is used. The objects are left to dry in yanalak, a special room within the workshop, where the firing kilns are also located. Objects to be fired are first exposed to sunlight in order to increase their temperature before placing them in a kiln for fumigation and burning.

The last part of the manufacturing process takes more than a day in the summer, but in winter the waiting time extends to more than a week. For pottery burning, the kiln temperature should be at exactly 1,200 degrees Celsius, otherwise the clay begins to break. The final step is a 12-hour cooling, moistening and polishing of the objects. These handmade objects will then serve you for many years.

How to make pottery in Avanos, Cappadocia - photo by Merve Göral

Pottery shopping in Avanos

Native to Avanos, Galip Körükçü is a sixth generation pottery-maker. Together with his wife Lillian, they work on traditional and contemporary pottery and ceramics. Chez Galip, Hasan Kalesi Mevkii No.3, Avanos; T: (0384) 511 45 77.

Types of traditional pottery objects

Due to their functionality, there are several types of traditional pottery objects produced in Avanos today, and used in contemporary households:

Types of traditional pottery objects

Üzlük - a small bowl, often used as part of a breakfast table setup to carry pekmez, olives, jams, or honey.

Küp - medium-sized bowl without handles used to make Avanos küp peyniri. Once the
curd is ready, the top of the
bowl is covered with clay and buried in the sand.

Testi - a vessel holding water. The clay paste used to produce this type of object is mixed with salt to enhance its cooling properties.

Güveç - popular type of small bowl used for oven-baked dishes. 

For fine examples of Avanos pottery browse our online collection at shoptheguide.com

Best makeup artists in Istanbul

Monica Liau
May 04, 2017

Melis İlkkılıç - photo by Merve GöralIf eyes are the window to the soul, the face is it’s finely fashioned gateway.  Meet accomplished beauty experts in Istanbul who are leaders in their craft, as adept at high fashion as they are everyday street style.

Melis İlkkılıç

After two years in the banking industry, Melis İlkkılıç decided to drop her resume off at the local M.A.C store, where she worked then worked in sales before breaking out on her own to go freelance. It was, in her words, “a very difficult road,” but one she loved. “My parents almost had a heart attack,” laughs İlkkılıç. “But they supported me, because it was something I was strongly passionate about.

Today she regularly works with a list of loyal customers, like Turkish actresses Neslihan Atagül and Merve Boluğur. İlkkılıç has a reputation for using makeup that caters to each individual. Although many of the women she works with want to look like a specific celebrity (Kylie Jenner is particularly popular right now), she says it’s important to cater to each person’s different looks and needs. “When I look at a person, I know what will make them shine,” she says. “I’ve spent 10 years learning by doing - each person has a unique feature to highlight.”  She works with a range of clients, often from her two-floor apartment in Göktürk, where she also keeps an eye on her young child. “The best advice I can give young makeup artists starting out is to keep going and get all the experience they can,” İlkkılıç says thoughtfully. “It takes a long time but look at me. I feel like finally, I made it, and I couldn’t be happier.”

The look: Melis İlkkılıç created a simple, yet striking look. The model’s natural skin is highlighted and glowing. The eyes are smoky, shadowed two tones darker than the model’s actual skin color, which accentuates her pretty orbs but remains undramatic. This combination is perfect for daytime and evening wear.

To see more of her work and schedule an appointment, visit www.melisilkkilic.com or www.instagram.com/melisilkkilic

Önder Tiryaki

Önder Tiryaki is one of the best-known names in the industry. He originally rose to prominence for his hair styling skills, his eye for beauty and his dextrous fingers - which now fluff the follicles of Turkey’s most talented and beautiful. “I dream something and prepare a look the way I want to see a woman - complete with make-up, hair, and place to go,”  says Tiryaki about his process. “I love best preparing someone for the red carpet.” Women like actresses Serenay Sarıkaya and Bergüzar Korel regularly show up at Tiryaki’s door.

Önder Tiryaki - photo by Merve Göral

In 2010, the spokesman for Pantene branched out into makeup, professionally. “I was never trained in makeup,” he says as he buzzes around his model, dabbing at her face. “I learned about it by doing it at home and watching videos.I think makeup was the missing part of me,” he says. “Makeup and hair are two very different arts, but they also complete each other.”

The look: Önder Tiryaki has created strong eyes for an evening out, creating dramatic shades but avoiding graphic, hard edges. Again the natural skin of the face is highlighted and allowed to shine through.

To flirt with fame, visit Önder Tiryaki Hair & Makeup Studio (reservation required), Husrev Gerede Caddesi, Sevinç Apt, No.86 d/1, Teşvikiye; T: (0212) 261 61 60

EBC Türkiye

European Beauty Concept is not necessarily a name that’s always in the media limelight. The company focuses more on training some of the best makeup and nail artists around the city, running classes and trainings on new techniques and products from their small space close to the busy Levent business district. But it is also here that founder Boriana Doganova, who hails from Bulgaria and is a long-time resident of Istanbul, works with single customers on their diverse set of makeup and nail needs, from daily touch-ups to dramatic looks for nights out on the town.

EBC - photo by Merve Göral

What makes this spot really unique is their expertise in permanent makeup. “It seems very scary to people when they first hear about it,” says Doganova. “But our techniques and technology have really advanced, so the makeup looks natural and lasts for about four months.” The most popular focus is eyebrows. Doganova and her team work with each client for sometimes hours, measuring the face and matching skin colors to ensure the eyebrows fit the face in shape and color. “Each person’s face and needs are very different, so we have to spend a long time making sure we get the shape perfect,” says Doganova. “Then the process itself is very quick and painless - and makes life easier when getting ready to go out.”

The look: Eyebrows are done in a natural shades that still look good even as they begin to fade. The model’s eyes are done in shimmering colors that pop.

For eyebrows that won’t fade from view and other expert services visit EBC Beauty Concept at Levent Caddesi 56, Levent; T:  (0212) 278 10 87

Hıdrellez with Kocani Orkestar

05 May
8:00pm - 12:00am

Hıdırellez is a spring celebration from India to the Balkans, celebrated on May 5. The following day, Macedonian Roma band Koçani Orkestar is coming to Istanbul for a Hıdırellez celebration at the Armada Hotel. Koçani Orkestar have performed at international music festivals, renowned for their fast-paced brass sound, inspired by the Turkish bands of the Ottoman Empire and filtered through the Balkan Roma spirit. This celebration includes a five-course meal and drinks on the Armada Hotel terrace. Tickets from Biletix.

06 May

End Date: 

Saturday, May 6, 2017 - 19:00

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Colombia's unique artistic voice Botero at Anna Laudel Contemporary

Joshua Bruce Allen
May 02, 2017

Fernando Botero - The President 2003 oil on canvas 45x35cmBorn in 1932, Fernando Botero is the most renowned artist of South America and a cultural icon in his native Colombia. A range of his sculptures, paintings, and drawings is now on display in Istanbul for the first time, brought from a private collection in Switzerland. Called Everyday's Poetry – Scenes from the Fullness of Life, the exhibition continues at Anna Laudel Contemporary until June 25. 

Although Botero is a figurative artist, his realism is filtered through an idiosyncratic lens. The salient characteristic of his work is the “large people”, a term that Botero has used to describe the stocky men and voluptuous women that fill his canvases. Whether nudes, musicians, circus performers, presidents, couples, or gangsters, all of Botero’s figures have similar forms. The artist never used live models, preferring to represent the figures that inhabited his mind.

Fernando Botero - Naked Woman on the Chair 2013 Oil on canvas 94x68 cmNoting Botero’s predecessors, exhibition curator Dr. Klaus Wolbert told The Guide Istanbul, “He was influenced by modern artists such as Picasso, but also artists in the past [such as] Pierro della Francesca and Giotto in Italy. He knows the history of European art very well.” In his hometown of Medellin, Botero took inspiration from the colonial baroque styles of the local churches and monasteries. Later he discovered Mexican painters such as Jose Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros, as well as Dali and the Surrealists. He also had the chance to study the Renaissance masters at museums in Madrid and Florence while traveling in Europe.

The exact reasons for Botero’s choice of large figures is unclear even to the artist himself, who says that he is simply drawn to them on a creative or subconscious level. Unlike many contemporary artists, Botero has remained faithful to that primal image throughout the decades. “Botero’s style is very independent of other movements in contemporary art. He’s very original. … His style didn’t change. From the beginning in the ‘50s, it has always been in the same manner,” Wolbert says.

Fernando Botero - Guitar Player 2003 Oil on canvas 28x37 cm

Despite living in Europe and North America for many years, Botero defines his art as resolutely Colombian, sticking to Colombian figures and themes in the majority of his work. His social conscience became apparent in a series of paintings on the drug cartels in Colombia, and in another series on the abuses at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

In the current exhibition, one painting in particular shows Botero’s Surrealist and satirical streak. Titled The President, the piece depicts an unnamed but presumably Colombian president sitting with a songbird perched on his finger. This strange juxtaposition of power and frivolity, while the president turns away from the bird with a disdainful look, opens the painting to political commentary. These ironic touches are typical of Botero, whose great love for Colombia is always tempered with humor.

AIMA Festival Orchestra

04 April
8:30pm - 11:00pm

Now celebrating its fourth year, the Ayvalık International Music Academy (AIMA) Festival Orchestra is coming for a special concert on İstiklal's Grand Pera Emek Stage on May 7. AIMA is a masterclass academy situated in the Aegean town of Ayvalık, and its festival orchestra features the best of Turkey's young classical talent. In this concert, foreign soloists Andrej Bielow and Marco Misciagna will perform everything from Baroque pieces to tango with the Ayvalık students. Bielow and Misciagna will be leading the violin and viola masterclasses at AIMA on July 22-30. Tickets are available from Biletiva

 

 

07 May

End Date: 

Sunday, May 7, 2017 - 13:45

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Jazz Spring at Yeldeğirmeni

04 April
11:00am - 12:00am
April 30 is International Jazz Day, and the Yeldeğirmeni neighborhood of Kadıköy is celebrating with a special program of concerts, exhibitions, and gastronomy. Starting with brunch accompanied by jazzy DJ sounds, then progressing through the day to end with "Jazzy Fish"-themed dinner, this is a multicolored expression of what jazz means to the world and Istanbul.
 
Events program:
 
11.00 - 15.00 : DJ Barthez accompanies Jazz Brunch - at No 39
13.00 - 19.30 : "Jazz In Town by Orçun Kaya" opening cocktails to jazz photography exhibition - at The Badau İstanbul
15.00 - 19.30 : "TheDuo" acoustic jazz performance - at Bitro Coffee / Shop / Performance
19.30 - 21.30 : Baturay Yarkın Trio feat. İpek Göztepe - at Hangart
21.00 - 00.00 : "Jazzy Fish" - at Kalabalık
30 April

End Date: 

Sunday, April 30, 2017 - 18:00

Event Category: 

CreativeMornings: Mercan Dede

04 April
9:00am - 10:30am

Taking place under the theme of "Beyond!", the CreativeMornings program of talks at ATÖLYE continues with Mercan Dede on April 28. Electronic and acoustic musician-composer Mercan Dede, aka Arkın Allen, has achieved great success with his mix of Turkish traditional music and contemporary electronic sounds. In this talk he will explain how through such musical fusion we can create a universal language, beyond cultural and geographical borders, as well as those of age, language, and ideology. This talk is free and open to the public, after signing up on the ATÖLYE website.

28 April

End Date: 

Friday, April 28, 2017 - 11:45

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Discover the rare and beautiful flowers of Anatolia

Joshua Bruce Allen
April 26, 2017

From the average tourist’s perspective, Turkey might seem to be a Mediterranean country with a landscape and climate similar to Greece. But as you move past the western coast and into central and eastern Anatolia, an array of unique vistas opens up. The many mountain ranges that cross Anatolia divide the land into distinct climates and environments. Over the millennia, these natural barriers have fostered local species and allowed them to survive. Compared to Western Europe, where around 1 percent of plants are endemic, almost one-third of Turkey’s flora are native and unique to their area. From one mountain to the next, Anatolia is a patchwork of biological history.

Verbascum wiedemannianumWild mullein: called mor sığırkuyruğu (purple cow’s tail) in Turkish, its Latin name is Verbascum wiedemannianum. This plant has a tall, flowering stem adorned with rich purple flowers. It is commonly found in the provinces of Ankara, Erzincan, Hatay, Kayseri, Sivas, Tokat, and Bayburt.

Armenian Poppy Papaver lateritium flower

This striking orange flower belongs to the Armenian poppy, named after the area of historical Armenia that is now within Turkey. The poppy’s range in northeastern Turkey crosses the modern-day borders with Armenia and Georgia.

Sevgi Çiçeği / Yanardöner

The Turkish names sevgi çiçeği (affection flower) or yanardöner (shimmering) perfectly describe this flower’s frilly, iridescent petals. These flowers are only found in the village of Hacı Hasan in Ankara province. Sadly, the spread of farmland in the area is threatening these flowers’ survival.

Fritillaria aurea

Fritillarias are bulbous flowers in the lily family, and this one of Turkey’s native varieties has the Latin name Fritillaria aurea, meaning Golden fritillaria. This is a dwarf species with yellow flowers covered in checkered brown spots and is distributed through Central and Southern Anatolia.

Fritillaria carica

Another kind of fritillaria, this flower grows in the Aegean and Mediterranean areas of İzmir, Muğla, and Antalya. The bell-like, golden flowers have a merry appearance. This fritillaria also has a smaller subspecies serpenticola that grows only in Antalya.

Damask rose, Isparta gülü

Although the Damask rose is not confined to Turkey, the country’s Isparta region is famous for growing these fragrant blooms, which originated in the Middle East or Central Asia. Perfume and beauty product companies around the world prize the rose oil produced from these flowers, which is rich in nutrients and has a therapeutic scent. Available from The Guide Shop, the gülsha range of Isparta rose products uses the expertise of French specialists to harness these qualities into all-natural skin care.

Çam Sut Mangal Restaurant

Located just across a busy intersection from another authentic Korean restaurant, Seorabeol, Çam Sut Mangal Restaurant’s unassuming facade hides a big personality that starts with the banchan. Many say a Korean restaurant can be judged solely on the quality of these small seasonal appetizers that arrive gratis at every table, and Çam Sut’s offerings boded well. The spread included three different kinds of homemade kimchi (cabbage, white radish and green onion) plus little bean sprouts just slicked in sesame oil, fresh greens, a blushing pink bowl of pickled watermelon radish in cold soup to cleanse the palate, and more.

On the menu, you’ll find many of the usual barbeque grill suspects - all done well - plus a few interesting specialties. Most brash is the Korean fried chicken, where nuggets of white and dark meat are twice fried and then tossed in a sweet and spicy, bright-red sauce. Though not the traditional chicken wings you’ll find in South Korea, it is the best rendition we’ve come across in Istanbul and will return time and again when the cravings hit. More subtle was silky vegetable and tofu stew, the broth redolent with umami-rich miso that fortified the stomach and soul. Add in an above-par bibimbap (the original, perfect Buddha bowl), filled with vegetables and in a stone pot so hot, the rice crisps on the bottom, and you have a meal that lifts the spirit. No wonder so many Korean expats directed us here - the food has true Seoul.

(0212) 278 78 26
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Aytar Caddesi No 10, Nispetiye

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Jasper Høiby's Fellow Creatures

04 April
8:00pm - 11:00pm

For International Jazz Day on April 30, Salon İKSV is hosting a concert with Danish double bassist Jasper Høiby and his band Fellow Creatures. In his early years Høiby played with leading names in the London jazz scene after studying at the Royal Academy of Music. Since forming the band Phronesis and recording his first album as band leader in 2007, Høiby has continued in the Phronesis trio up until today with the 2017 album The Behemoth. The brand new Fellow Creatures group features musicians Corrie Dick, Will Barry, Josh Arcoleo, and Jim Gold in a combo that has earned praise from Jamie Cullum. Tickets from Biletix.

30 April

End Date: 

Sunday, April 30, 2017 - 19:15

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Balkan Fire

04 April
8:30pm - 12:00am

A star cast of Balkan groups is coming together at Zorlu PSM's Balkan Ateşi (Balkan Fire) concert on April 28. German DJ, producer, and bandleader Shantel is onstage with Bucovina Club Orkestar, while Turkish clarinet virtuoso Serkan Çağrı is joined by Yarkın Ritm Grubu and Roma brass band Kocani Orkestar. The infectious beats and intoxicating melodies of the Balkans will sweep across the dancefloor at this meeting of musical legends. Tickets from Biletix.

28 April

End Date: 

Friday, April 28, 2017 - 18:45

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"Poland Now" film program

04 April

Istanbul Modern continues its program of local and international film screenings with three days of Poland Now, a showcase of contemporary Polish film on April 27, 29, and 30. These films are all by young, emerging directors who have been recognized at important festivals, showing that the cultural dynamics of Poland are still producing notable artists. Some of the outstanding films in the Istanbul Modern program are All These Sleepless Nights, which gained Michal Marczak the Best Directing award at the Sundance Film Festival World Cinema Documentary Competition; The Lure, which won a special jury prize, also at Sundance; and United States of Love, which took the Silver Bear for Best Script at the 2016 Berlin International Film Festival. See the full program at the Istanbul Modern website. The price of entry is either 14TL for the day or free for museum visitors (with a museum entry ticket). 

27 April

End Date: 

Sunday, April 30, 2017 - 18:15

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Palmiyeler

04 April
8:30pm - 11:30pm

Turkish surf-rock band Palmiyeler, whose name translates as "Palms", is coming to perform at Babylon Bomonti on April 26. Group members Mertcan Mertbilek, Tarık Töre, Rana Uludağ, and Barış Konyalı create a colorful and energetic performance filled with retro, seaside vibes and a Turkish twist that goes down as well in California as it does in Istanbul. Tickets from Biletix.

26 April

End Date: 

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 12:15

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Colin Stetson

04 April
8:00pm - 11:00pm

American saxophonist and reed player Colin Stetson is coming to Istanbul for a performance at Babylon Bomonti on April 30. He has come to international attention for his work with bands such as Arcade Fire, Bon Iver, Tom Waits, David Gilmore, and The National. As well as saxophone, he als performs with clarinet, bass clarinet, French horn, and cornet. Though he performs mostly with rock and indie bands, Stetson is a technical and experimental musician, stretching his instruments to the limit with circular breathing, microtones, and percussive sounds. Tickets are available from Biletix.

30 April

End Date: 

Sunday, April 30, 2017 - 11:30

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Artificial intelligence turns Ottoman archives into art

Joshua Bruce Allen
April 24, 2017

Refik Anadol, SALT GalataBack in 1968, Philip K Dick’s science fiction novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? asked whether intelligent robots could have genuine emotions. Technology is not quite there yet, but the collaborations at Google’s Artists and Machine Intelligence (AMI) program are making potentially revolutionary discoveries about the links between human and machine minds. AMI resident artist Refik Anadol has turned these tools to the archives at SALT Galata in his installation Archive Dreaming, which Dick might have titled, “Do Algorithms Dream of Alternative Histories?”

The SALT Galata archives include around 1.7 million documents, from fine art and portrait photographs to financial documents and architectural plans, ranging from the late-Ottoman era to the present day. This vast collection of data was inputted into the artificial intelligence (AI), which analyzed the visual qualities of each item and then assessed the relationships of similarity and difference between all 1.7 million items. The algorithm, called t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE), then arranged the data according to these relationships, which can be visualized in either 2-D (a scrollable spectrum) or 3-D (a cloud-like cluster) forms.

Anadol’s installation at SALT Galata is in a circular room with a mirrored ceiling and floor, producing a recursive effect of infinite space both above and below. This represents the metaphorical channel of data flowing from the archives to the touchscreen system in the center of the room. With this touchscreen, visitors can travel through the archive as a 2-D or 3-D space. You can also zoom in to a single item, zoom out to the entire archive as a ball of dots and strings, or view the data at any scale in between to group the items by various degrees of similarity. Being able to see the entire archive at a glance, and the connections between any one document and all the others in the archive, is a major advantage of this system.

Refik Anadol, SALT Galata

When not engaged by a human, the AI spontaneously “dreams” with the archive data that it has processed and possibly forms new connections and groupings that might never occur to a human mind.

Software expert Blaise Agüera y Arcas has noted that as AI is capable of recognizing classes of objects or faces by their common features, so AI can turn those classes into output, effectively “hallucinating” those objects onto neutral space. This is the principle behind Google’s Deep Dream software, which hallucinates faces and animals onto submitted images to create surreal results. Arcas has questioned the effect this artificial ability will have on human art in future—while the camera created a revolution by replicating the human eye, this software is beginning to replicate the functions of the human brain.

Refik Anadol, SALT Galata

This hints at exciting possibilities in the context of the SALT Galata archives. In a talk with Vasıf Kortun, artist Anadol explained how we might use artificial intelligence to create alternative histories: “The method we use here is creating a game of opposites between two networks: a differentiator that tries to learn how to differentiate real documents from fake documents, and a producer that tries to create fake documents for the differentiator to recognize. Once we’ve trained the producer, we can use the same statistical rules to create new images and create documents that look real but actually never existed … like documents that might come from another version of history.”

Archive Dreaming is on view at SALT Galata from April 20–June 11. Check out this video of the installation for a sneak preview of Anadol's work. 

Remembering John Freely, the memory of Istanbul

Joshua Bruce Allen
April 24, 2017

In memory of John Freely

To anyone who has taken a cursory look at an English-language bookstore in Istanbul, the name John Freely will be familiar. Known affectionately as “the memory of Istanbul”, Freely was one of those cross-cultural wonders who flourish in Istanbul’s fertile atmosphere. Though the city is mourning his passing on April 20, his many works of history, travel, science, and biographies will live on in the minds of millions.

Born in the 1920s to two Irish immigrants in New York, Freely dropped out of school at age 17 to serve with the US Navy in the final years of World War II. However, he was a curious and motivated young man, educating himself with travel and history books from the public library. After the war, he entered Iona College thanks to the GI Bill and then earned a PhD in physics at New York University and continued his postgraduate studies at Oxford University.

A formative moment in Freely’s later love for Istanbul came from an old book in his grandmother’s attic in Ireland. Freely’s great-grandfather had brought this book back from Istanbul where he had been stationed during the Crimean War. The engravings of minarets perched on the seven hills of Istanbul bewitched the young man’s imagination, planting a seed that would bear great fruit.

When the opportunity came to teach at Istanbul’s Boğaziçi University—the first American university founded outside of the United States—Freely jumped on it. This was the start of Freely’s Istanbul explorations, which he carried out with tireless consistency, walking every street of Beyoğlu and Fatih, researching the history of every house, mosque, fountain, tomb, and church. Freely’s 1972 classic Strolling Through Istanbul: A Guide to the City reflects his own walks through the old city, encouraging travelers to get outside, off the typical tourist trails, and discover the storied nooks and crannies around every corner.

Freely also had a knack for picking idiosyncratic and little-known characters from Istanbul’s history and turning their lives into history books that could have been novels. One of these, Jem Sultan: The Adventures of a Captive Turkish Prince in Renaissance Europe, recounts the life of pretender to the Ottoman sultanate Cem Sultan, who stood against Sultan Bayezid II and ended up in the curious position of being protected by the pope in Rome. Another is The Lost Messiah: In Search of the Mystical Rabbi Sabbatai Sevi, tracing the biography of the seventeenth-century rabbi who claimed to be the messiah and then converted to Islam along with some of his disciples who formed the ethnically Jewish but religiously Muslim community known as Dönme.

Spending so many days pounding Istanbul’s streets for hidden stories, Freely gained a wealth of knowledge on the past and present city that few foreigners, or locals for that matter, could possess. One of Freely’s lesser-known but quite charming books is Stamboul Sketches: Encounters in Old Istanbul, which collects bits and pieces that were too eccentric to fit into his previous books. Subjects include the city’s street cats and their relationship with human residents, wandering dervishes and forgotten Sufi lodges, the folk singers known as aşık, the strange names given to seasonal winds in the traditional Turkish calendar, the items on sale in the city markets, the shape of headstones in cemeteries, and the calculation of Ramadan according to the lunar calendar.

Freely’s books are available in all good bookstores in Istanbul, including D&R, Remzi Kitabevi, Pandora Kitabevi, and Homer Kitabevi.

Etnospor Culture Festival

04 April

The Etnospor Culture Festival is an international celebration of Turkish, Turkic, and Central Asian sports and culture. Besides displays of mounted archery, oil wrestling, and other traditional Turkic sports, there will be Turkic tents, Central Asian delicacies, mehter military band shows, children's plays, horseriding for adults and children, and folk music concerts. This year the festival will take place on May 11-14 at Yenikapı Square. Find out more at the festival's website.

11 May

End Date: 

Sunday, May 14, 2017 - 13:45

Event Category: